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Thread: chuck plate/face plate

  1. #1
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    chuck plate/face plate

    I was given some 2 x6 oak that was part of some piece of furniture. I cut all the dados out, pulled all the nails and screws out, and cut around to make pieces.
    I glued a one inch block of hardwood to the 2 inch block, so I can screw the glue block into the face plate, so I can play with it, see if I can make anything resembles a plate or low bowl.
    I was looking around for really, really cheap chucks just for my cheapo lathe, and IM a bit confused between face plates vs chuck plates.
    I can mount a chuck on certain face plates but not on other, need chuck plate. Are they the same thing?does is depend strictly on hole alignment on plate as to whether or not it will hold a certain chuck?

  2. #2
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    Allen, the only chuck plates I'm familiar with (and only vaguely, at that) are for metal lathes. I think you're looking for something like one of these, sometimes referred to as a "scroll chuck":

    http://www.pennstateind.com/store/CUG3418C.html

    http://www.pennstateind.com/store/CSC500.html

    http://www.pennstateind.com/store/CSC2000C.html

    Any of those would be decent starter chucks, and still be worth having down the road when you upgrade your lathe.

    Another good chuck that can move with you to a new lathe would the Nova G3:

    http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st..._nova_g3?Args=

    The closest things to a chuck plate I know of for a wood lathe are commonly called "jumbo jaws" or "flat jaws" like these, and they still require a chuck like one of the ones I linked to:

    http://www.pennstateind.com/store/flat-jaws.html
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    chuck plate/face plate

    Allen,

    I think you might be referring to chuck mounting plates, as Vaughn stated, which would be used to mount chucks for metal lathes. (although I think I have seen something about them somewhere for certain wood lathe chucks too)

    I would like to suggest one more of Penn State product, the Barracuda 2.

    http://www.pennstateind.com/store/CSC3000C.html

    I have one and like it. It came with four sets of jaws and is a key operated chuck, which is much easier to use than the other "Tommy bar" chucks. I also bought a set of flat jaws which come in handy for finish turning the bottom of bowls and such.

    Aloha, Tony
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

    Registered voting member

    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

  4. #4
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    Recommend the Barracuda 4. It is big but since it comes with four sets of jaws is very-very versatile. You can put a spur in the center and maybe never have to remove the chuck.
    Even though you claim the lathe is cheap, you can still do good work with the right accessories and you can keep them if you replace the lathe.

  5. #5
    Those smoke breathing Californians are right,


    Chuck Plate is a term relating to Metal Lathe turning, it is a disk screwed to the spindle , contains slots tho insert the tail of a dog that hold the stock and applies torque to turn the materisl. (the material is suspended between centers, on on the tail stock assembly and the other inserted in the middle of the Chuck Plate)

    Face Plate is reserved for wood lathe, where it is a disk that threads onto the spindle and has holes for screwing the material (or a sacrifice material glued to stock) Some turners are happy with glueing the faceplate to the stock with hot glue, etc.

    A chuck, is a gripping device that will hold the stock. 3 jawed chucks are usually reserved for round stock on a metal lathe. Four jawed chucks have been designed for wood lathes holding round stock. There are also four jawed independent chucks where each of the jaws are adjusted indepently allowing for odd shaped material can be clamped in. These are used both with metal lathes and wood lathes.

    Back when I began turning, no one had thought of adapting a metal working chuck to a wood lathe, we only had spindles or faceplates, then someone got a good idea and made adaptations, some fine devices have emerged.

    Progress: I use faceplates, independent jawed chucks and the self centering chucks. Each has it own advantages and none is better than another. Just Preferances.
    Last edited by Bill Simpson; 09-06-2009 at 03:57 PM.

  6. #6
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    my 88 dollar lathe came with a face plate.
    I was going to buy a cheap chuck with it, but the chuck said it needed a plate.
    I decided 88 dollars was enough to experiement.
    So I cut up a piece of birch, the only thing I had planed and flat in my garage last night. Mistake, because birch is hard, hard hard.
    I screwed it into the face plate, then glued a piece of oak(oak from a piece of furniture my wood guy was discarding, but I took it home, descrewed it, cut around all the dados, and had some short thick pieces, figured eventually for cutting boards).
    I cut the oak down to almost a circle.
    I screwed the plate onto the headstock, and with my cheapo dull chisels(alot of practice, nothing to sharpen them with except sharpening paper, not working out too well), and began to spin a tiny bowl. I just wanted to make a small change dish for my son for helping me out with the driveway this morning. Oak is hard, my chisels are too dull, my hands are tired, but after an hour of playing, I was in around an inch, nothing fancy, as simple as simple can be, and the dull chisel hit the side of the oak and boom, the top of the side cracked off. so much for that. I was only going another 1/2 inch down, then going to even it out and put poly on it. Getting the oak off the birch was another story. I used too big of a glue block, couldnt cut it off on the lathe, so I went to the bandsaw, and almost took my fingers off.
    So much for wood turning today. I need to get something to sharpen the chisels with, its down right dangerous. (to use dull chisels, especially when youre unskilled)
    Another problem with my 88 dollar lathe, is that the lowest speed in only around 1200, maybe too fast for a bowl, I dont know. But I did have fun, loads of fun until the bandsaw got mad.My fault, but it will never happen again. This is how it ended up, and when you guys see pictures of my backyard, youll see my lathe pieces thrown around, I chuck them onto the lawn so I dont have to have them laying around the shop.
    (my wife said it looks like a doggie dish, shes right ofcourse. but I have no shame. I did learn to spin oak you need really sharp chisels)
    I got a jewelry chest waiting on magnets, gonna go do something I dont know how too.

    btw, spinning things is alot harder than those guys on the videos make it look. I think Ill master hand cut dovetails before I can spin something Id use on a piece of furniture.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails wood stuff 1242 (Medium).jpg   wood stuff 1244 (Medium).jpg  
    Last edited by allen levine; 09-06-2009 at 04:11 PM.

  7. #7
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    entire new world to me, like a first day woodworker. Id highly recommend spinny work for anyone.

  8. #8
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    Hey Allen,
    Great first bowl. And a little catch now and then will keep you on your toes.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
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    Man, your day was full of lessons, huh? You learned the danger of dull tools, and the hazards of cutting round stock on a bandsaw.

    I hadn't realized your lathe's lowest speed was that high. That is indeed way fast for bowls and such, especially the initial roughing cuts. Is this the lathe you got?

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=45276

    And the last question...which set of turning tools did you get? Was it the $9.99 set or the $45.00 high speed steel set?
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  10. #10
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    That was a day of lessons.
    Interesting that you throw out failed pieces. But, you are showing determination to stick with it. That's good.
    Interestingly, I seem to get sentimentally attached to my failed pieces and just keep them on my workbench. Very large, eclectic collection of blown pen blanks and larger stuff. Needless to say, the 'work' area on my workbench is shrinking.
    BTW, those pros use green wood. That's why you see shavings fly like crazy. I think most of use wood on hand and that is invariably dry.

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