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Thread: Wood Storage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Manistique, Michigan
    Posts
    297

    Wood Storage

    I am in the process of finishing off the cold storage area of my shop and combining it with the original shop. The shop was 20 x 28 with 20 x 24 of cold storage. Now it is 20 x 52 - it is huge - I am still a bit in shock after I ripped out the partition wall. Good thing I have an outdoor wood boiler. I will be posting pictures of the shop tomorrow.

    My issue is how to store plywood. I will have enough room to store it flat - I understand that this is the best way. The thought was to put a shelf for storing sheets about waist high. I like this idea because I can pull a sheet off the shelf easily alone onto a table. From there, I can break down the sheets with my EZ Smart. I plan to build a table like the EZ Smart table.

    Lumber can be stored under the plywood shelf and shelves could be built above to store lumber or whatever (plastic tool storage boxes, plumbing supplies, electrical supplies, etc.).

    If I store it vertical on the 8 foot edge, it will take up a lot less room. It will be more difficult to get it on the table to break it down.

    If you had the room, what would you do?
    Rich (the Yooper)

    "To the world, you may be one person, but to one person, you may be the world."

    "Common sense is not so common."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    Store it verticle on the 4 foot edge about 4 ft high. Tyhe you can still store stuff below it. The you only need to lay it flat to brake it down.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Manistique, Michigan
    Posts
    297
    Don,

    That is a great idea. My ceilings are 8' high so I will have to store it on the 8' side. I have help when I unload it and put it in storage. I can easily flip a sheet down alone when I need it. The issue is mainly 3/4" thick. I can store the thinner sheets the same way along another wall and easily choose and handle a sheet as needed.
    Last edited by Rich Aldrich; 09-08-2009 at 02:02 AM.
    Rich (the Yooper)

    "To the world, you may be one person, but to one person, you may be the world."

    "Common sense is not so common."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,477
    another plus on the horizontal storge from don is yu can still pull out andlay flat on table to break down and can store lumber underneath it easily.. mine is vertical and have seen where i wished i had ben horizontal.. but my space didnt allow for it..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Acacia Ridge, Brisbane
    Posts
    23
    Storage of plywood is tricky for me because unfortuantely we don't all have massive storage rooms/sheds like you do! Making me very jealous early in the morning I can tell you that! But I agree with the suggestions here. Just make sure that you take into account humidity and all that so that the beamsa and planks don't warp while they are in storage.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,022
    I don't like flat storage. Flat makes it hard to get to the bottom of the stack. It also makes it hard to store anything less than a full sheet. You may have strips - 1/2 sheets - 1/4 sheets in a variety of materials. I would have a vertical storage on the 4' edge, and make rack type storage above for lumber. I would tuck it onto a corner and plan to use floor space of 24" x 96" x 48 " high. Just make sure you have 10 feet or so to slide out a full sheet as you need to.

    As to the size of your area. It may seem like a lot now - but I could EASILY envision using and even crowding in that entire area. So, I would still be conservative with the space.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wapakoneta, OH
    Posts
    611
    I store mine in a pole barn we have. It's vertical on the 4' edge. I agree that flat storage is the best, but if you have a few different kinds, the one you need will always be on the bottom. As Leo indicated, that's a PITA. Before we moved here I put it in a shed we had, and that was vertical on the 8' edge. That was a little bit more of a fight to handle but still worked well. If you have several sheets stacked together it won't bow.

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