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Thread: needing a saw

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Mountain Home, Arkansas
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    needing a saw

    I don't do much with Neander tools anymore. But there is always a need for something not powered.
    I need a saw, like a backsaw. Have had several over the years but they were always junk. I'm determined to get a decent one.
    Two questions:
    What is the difference between a 'backsaw' and a 'tenon' saw?
    I'll be going to an antique store about 30 miles away that specializes in old tools. Hope to get quality and save some money. Enney brands I should be alert for?

  2. #2
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    Oct 2006
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    ozarks
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    diston used to make some good saws.
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
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    Oct 2006
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    Central NY State
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    Frank, I may be all wrong but, I think a tenon saw is filed rip, for cutting tenons along the grain. A back saw is usually crosscut.

    EC Atkins, Disston, Spear & Jackson all good.

    Problem with the old saws is condition. If you can file and sharpen, then you're in good shape. It's a skill I've not mastered.

    Please post results of your quest. And good luck. Oh also - take a look at the Disstonian Institute.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
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    38

    Not an expert, but

    I understand the term 'back saw' to apply to a variety of saws. They all have a stiffening rib or back applied on the back of the blade.

    Back saws come in different sizes, point per inch, and in cross-cut or rip tooth form.

    Some of the different types I've heard about are: tenon, dove tail, and carcass. There are probably a number of others. If you want to learn a lot more, or check in with an expert, check out Chris Schwarz blog on the Popular Woodworking site (http://blog.woodworking-magazine.com/blog).

    And now I've gone way over my labor grade qualifications.

    Dick
    Last edited by Richard Line; 09-09-2009 at 07:22 PM. Reason: Add signature

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Catalunya
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    4,632
    Before buying any antique saw think about how much do you want to spend on it and if you feel yourself cofident enough to bring it back to life.

    Good new saws are not ( or so I think) that expensive compared to planes for instance.

    Besides some brands like Gramercy tools and Mike Wenzloff sell their saws in kit format as well for about half the price of a finished one.
    60-70$ for a saw kit is expensive? the same saw costs finished 130-140$? so
    Best regards,
    Toni

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    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  6. #6
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    I'm planning more like $15.00 to $20.00.
    I went to one popular vendor and their saws were $3.99 on sale for $2.99.
    Over the years, I have tossed out several of those cheapies. Really, I'm pretty sure this antique shop will have quite a few in my price range. I can make or repair a handle if necessary. And, I can toss in my electro-bath de-ruster tube if needed.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    I'm planning more like $15.00 to $20.00.
    I went to one popular vendor and their saws were $3.99 on sale for $2.99.
    Over the years, I have tossed out several of those cheapies. Really, I'm pretty sure this antique shop will have quite a few in my price range. I can make or repair a handle if necessary. And, I can toss in my electro-bath de-ruster tube if needed.
    My concern would be more on the sharpening and setting side rather on the rust cleaning and handle repair. How good are you at sharpening saws?

    I tried it once and the results were "dissapointing" not to use a word that would break the COC rules. I've seen some good dovetail saws at quite cheap prices on ebay (10-15$), Disstons and similars, but my incompetence in sharpening them makes me restrain myself from buying any.
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    15,807
    If you can learn to pull the saw, the Japanese style saws are great, the blades last and last, and if you do hit a nail, you just replace the blades.

    Lots of different places sell them in the US.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Salt Spring Island, BC Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    If you can learn to pull the saw, the Japanese style saws are great, the blades last and last, and if you do hit a nail, you just replace the blades.

    Lots of different places sell them in the US.
    I totally agree with Stu. The Japanese saws are amazing. I hung a few of my old saws up when Alex sent me one. It didn't take long to get use to the draw action and I love mine now and can't figure how I ever used my old saws before.
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toni Ciuraneta View Post
    My concern would be more on the sharpening and setting side rather on the rust cleaning and handle repair. How good are you at sharpening saws?

    I tried it once and the results were "dissapointing" not to use a word that would break the COC rules. I've seen some good dovetail saws at quite cheap prices on ebay (10-15$), Disstons and similars, but my incompetence in sharpening them makes me restrain myself from buying any.
    I have perfected the technique for saw sharpening. Here is what I do:
    I drive to the other end of town, leave them with the disabled guy who does professional sharpening for extra income. Return in a few days, pay him, take saw home. Works every time.

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