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Thread: rubbing oil

  1. #1
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    rubbing oil

    We had a demo on finishing at my woodturning club yesterday. The guy who gave it is a retired professional furniture refinisher.
    He did one project with CA. Between applications he sanded with 120 grit, rubbed with 'rubbing oil' added another app. of CA, etc. for about four coats. Beautiful and only took a few minutes.
    Then he did two bowls. Both were first sealed with sanding sealer then a couple coats of lacquer, then rubbed with 'rubbing oil' more lacquer, etc.
    They only took a few minutes each and he was passing them around to be looked at. Great finishes and dry.
    He uses Mohawk products. He will be ordering in discount quantities for club members to buy. He says they are the best anywhere and what he used professionally for many years.
    I had never heard of rubbing oil but it works.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  2. #2
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    I haven't done enough turning to count yet, but what I've read about others using is BLO. I've used BLO and Naphtha in a 1/1 ratio for years on flatwork and I've also tried it on pens, alternating it with CA.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  3. #3
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    I am not to sure about rubbing oil under Lacquer. I've had lacquer alligator because of oil drying.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hawksford View Post
    I am not to sure about rubbing oil under Lacquer. I've had lacquer alligator because of oil drying.
    I didn't have a chance to talk much with him. So, I don't really know what the product is made of.
    Calling it "rubbing oil" doesn't necessarily mean it is an oil.
    I do know it is a yellow liquid, he doesn't use much between applications and, from what I saw, it works.
    When I learn more, I'll let y'all know.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  5. #5
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    Cool Frank, this would be good to follow up on. Some guys that do french polishing will add to much oil to the bob for a good slide and transfer to much oil to the surface which will cause the shellac to crack.

    Oil base paint on a house which is covered with latex will cause the paint to peal off in sheets.

  6. #6
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    Ok, I called the guy who did the demo, his name is Phil.
    During the demo, the fellow sitting next to me wouldn't stop talking so I missed most of the explanation.
    Here is the procedure. Using either CA or lacquer as the finish it goes like this: (I liked what he did on the bowls with lacquer so I'll say lacquer)
    Spray with sanding sealer, allow to dry apx. 20 min.; using the rubbing oil [which he said is a type of cutting oil] sand at 400 grit; apply another 3 to 4 coats of lacquer; sand with the rubbing oil at 400 grit; repeat process as many times as you wish. He does about four. Works. Beautiful.
    He is ordering the rubbing oil in gallons and will repackage in 8 or 16 oz. bottles with pump dispensers and sell as a club project. It is made by Mohawk.
    http://www.mohawk-finishing.com/
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  7. #7
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    He is wet sanding with the rubbing oil, Then I would suspect that he wiped off excess. Since he has a lacquer bass the oil will not stick. Some guys will use a oil glaze very thin with tint to antique the finish after sealing but that's about a much as far as I would go with oil under lacquer.

  8. #8
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    ok he sprayed the bowl with sanding sealer - rubbing oil and 400 grit sand - repeat laquer sanding lightly with 400 and cutting oil for 3-4 coats
    Questions
    I would think there would be problems with laquer/oil/laquer/oil/ in layers like that. Have you tried to do this finish?
    What is the name of the cutting oil he used?
    Last coat i would assume is Laquer - is he using 0000 and buffing or just leaving the laquer as the final thing and doing nothing?

    Thanks Dan
    First you have to learn the rules - Beginner
    Then you have to learn advanced rules - Professional
    Then you disregard the rules - This takes you to the master level................

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Mosley View Post
    ok he sprayed the bowl with sanding sealer - rubbing oil and 400 grit sand - repeat laquer sanding lightly with 400 and cutting oil for 3-4 coats
    Questions
    I would think there would be problems with laquer/oil/laquer/oil/ in layers like that. Have you tried to do this finish?
    What is the name of the cutting oil he used?
    Last coat i would assume is Laquer - is he using 0000 and buffing or just leaving the laquer as the final thing and doing nothing?

    Thanks Dan
    I have not tried it. I just saw the demo Saturday and called him this a.m. No problems. That is why I'm kinda in awe at the process. A bowl takes only minutes to finish this way.
    The oil is Mohawk Rubbing Oil.
    Last coat was lacquer. Mohawk rattle can. He only used a paper towel on the slow turning bowl. He then passed it around and it was dry to the touch. Amazing.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  10. #10
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    About 30 seconds of research yielded this from Mohawk:

    From the product web page:
    "A concentrated lubricant that eliminates the need for rubbing oil and solvents. This rubbing lubricant is a multi-purpose rubbing compound in either liquid or paste form made to prepare all finished wood surfaces. Water soluble, nontoxic, contains no silicones. Excellent for removing pack marks. Gives a smooth clear finish. Use with Steel Wool or Abrasive Pads. Furniture rubbed with Wool-Lube™ rubbing lubricant may be re-coated with lacquer or wax with good adhesion. Finally, Wool-Lube™ rubbing lubricant does not gum up on the finished surface. Just wipe clean with a cloth and the furniture is ready to be waxed or polished."


    Also, check the Data Sheet

    Isn't it amazing what you can find with a few keystrokes?

    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

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