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Thread: 45 on maple

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Westphalia, Michigan
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    45 on maple

    I have a quick question for you old school folks. Is there a hand plane for planing angles on a board? I want to hand plane a 45 degree edge on some drawer fronts. These maple drawer fronts seem pretty brittle and burn easy so I was thinking about doing them by hand.

  2. #2
    You can get a chamfer plane but I've only seen them used to knock of the corners or flat stock. I'd probably opt for cutting almost all of it on a table sae and then use a block plan to finish it off.
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    daiku woodworking
    ^deshi^
    neoshed

  3. #3
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    Feb 2007
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    Patric I have been using the table saw but have experienced to much tear out. These are book matched figured, spalted maple boards (15 drawers) and I can't afford to lose even one. I thought a hand tool might be the safest way. I have looked at some planes on the web and might go that route. I may just set a guide up and use my one plane to put the chamfers on.

    I am beginning to see the light and wisdom on having more hand tools. I just hate to buy new tools when I could have been collecting them from yard sales and the like. A Lee Valley block plane with chamfer guide runs $180.

  4. #4
    I just had another thought but it would require you to make it. You can build a shooting board and then make a 45 degree support and place your workpiece on it and plane away. I'm assuming it's not a long chamfer you need to do.

    Here's an idea of what it looks like

    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMad...erfection.html

    scoll down to "testing the donkey's ear"
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    daiku woodworking
    ^deshi^
    neoshed

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by patrick anderson View Post
    I just had another thought but it would require you to make it. You can build a shooting board and then make a 45 degree support and place your workpiece on it and plane away. I'm assuming it's not a long chamfer you need to do.

    Here's an idea of what it looks like

    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMad...erfection.html

    scoll down to "testing the donkey's ear"
    was thinking that it could be done with a shooting board.
    Yes I
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Sep 2007
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    Do you have or have access to a Ridgid Oscillating Edge Belt / Spindle Sander? the table can be tilted to 45 degrees and use the belt sander setup and accomplish with out tearout. Not a real wide belt, but used carfully it works. I have used mine that way.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
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    I just use my block plane, no fence or shooting board required. You would be surprised what you can accomplish by hand. Granted you should practice first. You can mark (lightly) the edges of the chamfers with a marking gauge to ensure uniformity of the width and plane away until they just disappear. Develop your hand skill instead of always falling back on jigs or aids first and the work will go faster in the long run. Just my two cents.

    One more thing, do the end grain first.

  8. #8
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    I may look into both the shooting board just for the sake of learning something. On the other hand I am used to doing a lot of hand work from my previous career so Bill's idea is what I was leaning toward. It does give me pause considering the book-match issue and not being able to screw one drawer up. I do have plenty of the wood so I something to practice with.

  9. #9
    You will want to hone up on your sharpening skills. I am with Bill on this one. Just use a block plane freehand, but with spalted wood which is like end grain everywhere, it would have to be super sharp.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    ozarks
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    use a #12 or the like......no tearout.
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

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