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Thread: Antique repair

  1. #1

    Antique repair

    My wife inherited a "secretary" from her parents that is in need of some repair and restoration. I am definitely not very accomplished at this but I thought I'd attempt a bit of the work, at least the chipped parts as well as some of the re-gluing.

    The close-up photos show the front of the drawer that has been chipped on both ends. I'd like some suggestions how to repair these chips.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 100_2633.jpg   100_2628.jpg   100_2629.jpg   100_2630.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
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    Get some wood of the same species, cut and carve, then glue em in. When you cut the pieces make em big enough to handle easily. This will make crving them safer. Then where the end piece is after you have them carved to fit just cut them off at the lenght needed to fit in. You last cut will be on the outside of the piece.

    Welcome to my world.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
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    8,529
    BTW you shop floor is way to clean...
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Catalunya
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    4,632
    That looks like oak, isn't it?

    In addition to what Don has said, if you are careful when choosing the piece you can try to match the grain as much as you can, and it will help to disguise the joint.

    If you need to re-carve a bit first glue and carve once dry.

    BTW The central face is a greenman, have you noticed it?
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  5. #5
    I would suggest some QSWO Dutchman, using a chisel and such, clean up the break into a smooth clean edge (square up the hole or flatten it off, being sure to anticipate difficulty in clamping when you orienate the cut surface. Carefully orienate the grain and secure with a dark glue (perhaps an Epoxy)

    Using files, chisels, sandpaper and the like to reshape the Dutchman to match the original, then color will be the problem.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    falcon heights, minnesota
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    i noticed it right off, didn't know what it was called.
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    Using files, chisels, sandpaper and the like to reshape the Dutchman to match the original, then color will be the problem.
    As for color matching go to woodcraft and get some tranfast Dye in Golden Oak. You can change the dilution as needed to get the color to match. Practice on a piece of scrap of the same species. After you apply the dye wet it with mineral spirits to see how it will look finished. You should have no problem getting a match.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Thanks for all the suggestions, guys. You give me more credit than I deserve thinking I can carve the piece, but I'll try. The last time I tried carving wood was in high school woodshop. Fortunately I do have some QSWO already so that is a start. It is some old wood and hopefully I can find some with grain to match but I'm not really sure it is oak. There are some stange looking reddish grain running through that don't look like typical medullary ray flecks.

    By the way, Don, you should see the rest of my shop; it is not as clean as you think. I chose the only spot that is clean for the photo, less distracting.

    Toni, I did notice the carving but didn't know it had a name. I looked it up on Google after you mentioned it, very interesting.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Toni Ciuraneta View Post

    BTW The central face is a greenman, have you noticed it?
    Hadn't noticed that until you mentioned it, makes for a Cool piece and worth rescueing...

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Levine View Post
    Thanks for all the suggestions, guys. You give me more credit than I deserve thinking I can carve the piece, but I'll try. .
    Carving is simple, just cut away everything that doesn't belong (w/o cutting away the parts that do)

    Keep us posted...

  10. #10
    Bill, easy for you to say. I don't think I'd attempt it if it wasn't such a small piece to carve. My main task is to make it fit so the seam is barely visible. The finish won't be too much of a problem. All there is left of it is the stain. I should be able to wipe it down with mineral spirits and add some new stain then some poly. I have a sprayer and may attempt to use it for the stain.

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