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Thread: A Morris Guitar

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Tokyo Japan
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    A Morris Guitar

    My lovely wife and youngest daughter went by the clothes recycling place on Sunday, on their way out to Costco, they dropped off a BUNCH of clothes, stuff I don't wear anymore, and a bunch of cute little girl clothes that don't fit my two big girls anymore All the clothes go to charity. While leaving the place my daughter spied an acoustic guitar, and while she was looking at it, one of the guys their asked her if she wanted it, but it was busted and needed fixing. She took one look at it, turned to my wife and said "Papa can fix that...right...?" My wife had confidence that I could fix it, so they got the guitar for free, with the bag/carrying case included.

    Now I know next to nothing about guitars, but as luck would have it my buddy Stu (Yes I know another Canadian named Stu here in Japan ) was at my house, we were working on his crashed bike, and he knows guitars, and in fact plays guitars. He said that the Morris guitars are from fairly good to outstanding.

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    This one looks to be a "Fairly Good" guitar, F-01/NAT, selling for about $250 US street price here. It is made in China, but it is still a Morris.

    here is what the guitar should look like......
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    And a look at the problem

    Well, I figured I could fix that fairly easily, just some way to inject some good old white glue, a couple of clamps and it should be fine.

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    I used two boards to protect the guitar and very lightly clamped it in my vice, then I took a drink straw, and stuck it in my glue pot, I sucked up a fair bit of glue, then I lightly heated the area just behind the end of the glue in the straw, and squeezed it with some pliers, sealing the straw. The I could stick the straw up into the crack on the guitar and squeeze the straw, making the glue inject into the crack. I put a fair bit of glue up there, and then I started to lightly clamp the guitar neck, while wiping off the excess glue that was being squeezed out......

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    Clamped up and wiped off, I hope it holds once restrung.

    My 13 year old daughter has now taken an interest in learning the guitar, that is cool with me, I think being able to play the acoustic guitar is a good thing.

    Tonight when I'm done at the L shop, I'll be heading to the Dungeon to unclamp the guitar and give it a light refinishing, then I'll restring it, and try to tune it. For the tuning I have the Mac, in the app Garage Band (free with the Mac) there is a section on learning the guitar and a tool to tune your guitar, you pick a string and the Mac listens to your guitar, and tells you to tighter or loosen the string, very cool.

    I hope it works out that my daughter's confidence, as well as my wife's, in my ability to fix this bears out. I sure don't want to disappoint my little girl!

    As a bonus, the guitar looks almost brand new, there is next to know wear on the guitar, even the fret board looks very new, and the thing plastic cover on the pick guard is still in place. The guitar bag has all of the warranty card and when it was made (May 2006) etc right in the bag.

    Wish me luck that the glue job holds, I think it should
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    pretty cool Stu! Hope your friend Stu was OK after mangling his motorscooter...
    -Ned

  3. #3
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    Yep, Stu is just fine, he has a small scab, about the size of a quarter, on his right wrist, there was a space between his short gloves and his jacket that touched down, other wise fine. He lost the front end in a fairly slow speed corner, the bike slid out from under him, and as it left the pavement, the bike dug into the soft shoulder and stood up, so it could pancake right into the stone cliff like wall on that edge of the road. Mainly cosmetic damage.

    Stu is a good buddy, I've known him a very long time here, and while we don't ride bikes together anymore, he still comes around for some wrenching and lie telling He is a good egg, he ALWAYS buys the pizza. I told him I like having him around, the conversation is good, the pizza is great, but reminder he brings about how cheap my woodworking hobby is compared to the motorcycle riding hobby is just simply fantastic The bike he was riding is a 2005 Kawasaki ZX10R, used it is worth $8000, heck, my SawStop ONLY cost $5400 and will outlast his bike by many decades

    Geez, look at me hijacking my own thread
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    London, Ontario
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    uh-oh, we're about to lose Stu to the luthier forums...

    Quick, someone create a luthier sub-forum here!

    Friend of mine is really into guitars, and he was telling me about trying to fix a neck on a guitar of his -- he used a broken esspresso machine to generate steam, and injected it into some holes (he had to drill) where the neck meets the body, so that it loosened the glue up and the neck popped off.

    I should ask him how that turned out.

    Anyway, it makes me think that the whole neck should be replaceable if this repair were to fail. But anyways, it was free so what's the loss!?

    ...art

    ps: Vaughn, very forward-thinking having that guitar icon available.
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Mountain Home, Arkansas
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    Neat. But, personally, I would have reinforced with dowels or threaded brass rods like are used to repair gun stocks. The strings on a guitar, when tightened, put a lot of stess on the neck.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  6. #6
    Stu...

    I've watched some of your posts on YouTube, and based on the things I've seen you do in the dungeon I'd say your daughter's faith in your ability to fix anything is probably well-founded.

    The angle of the break will cause it to want to separate as the strings are tightened, so I'd guess it would a good idea to let the glue fully cure (maybe 3 or 4 days??) before stressing the joint too much. Some brass pins as Frank suggests might be good as well.

    Also, if you string it with gut (now nylon I think) strings instead of steel strings, they "might" not exert as much force...also be easier on your daughter's fingertips. Then later when her fingers are stronger and she has those guitar player's calluses you could go to steel.

    Good luck with that. That's a pretty nice looking guitar, and the price was certainly right.

    Cheers.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Mulder View Post
    uh-oh, we're about to lose Stu to the luthier forums...

    Quick, someone create a luthier sub-forum here!

    ...art
    Luthier Forum...... I did not think of that, I'll go and look and see what some of them say

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    Neat. But, personally, I would have reinforced with dowels or threaded brass rods like are used to repair gun stocks. The strings on a guitar, when tightened, put a lot of stess on the neck.
    I was thinking something similar my self Frank, maybe it would be worth while to do just that, a couple of short dowels or some threaded brass rod just might be the trick!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Gerhard View Post
    Stu...

    I've watched some of your posts on YouTube, and based on the things I've seen you do in the dungeon I'd say your daughter's faith in your ability to fix anything is probably well-founded.

    The angle of the break will cause it to want to separate as the strings are tightened, so I'd guess it would a good idea to let the glue fully cure (maybe 3 or 4 days??) before stressing the joint too much. Some brass pins as Frank suggests might be good as well.

    Also, if you string it with gut (now nylon I think) strings instead of steel strings, they "might" not exert as much force...also be easier on your daughter's fingertips. Then later when her fingers are stronger and she has those guitar player's calluses you could go to steel.

    Good luck with that. That's a pretty nice looking guitar, and the price was certainly right.

    Cheers.
    Thanks Ed

    I think I'll be making some guitar picks for her, but I'll also be buying some plastic picks too I guess.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
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    Oct 2006
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    OK, I found this online >> Fixing a Pig Head Crack << OK, he uses hot hide glue, but says this is so to resist the glue softening if the guitar is left for a long time in a car in the summer

    I think the straight glue job will work, time will tell!

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
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    Jul 2009
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    Amherst, New Hampshire
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    Nice find and nice fix
    I wonder what made it crack in the first place ?
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Kansas City, Missouri
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    Nice find! Typically that type of break occurs when it's laid with its back to the wall and pressure is applied. Make sure she lays it face first to the wall or puts it in a stand..
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

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