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Thread: Welcome to the Shop Tours forum

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,068
    Dad's pic.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails VGarage_CabinetIsland9-20-0.jpg  
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Boca Raton FLorida
    Posts
    101
    Stu, i really enjoyed the tour. i'm curious, how do you get wood down in the dungeon?

    Glenn I love that diagram. Great shop.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,760
    Quote Originally Posted by Gene Miller View Post
    Stu, i really enjoyed the tour. i'm curious, how do you get wood down in the dungeon?
    Good old gravity, with a strong back to slow it down at the right moment

    I do have an electric hoist for heavy stuff, and a 1 tonne chain hoist for the really heavy stuff.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Sarnia, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    44

    Door size

    Stu,
    That was a good tour.. had me chuckling more than once.. I don't have any beer in my fridge either.. only water and diet vernors.. helps ensure I keep an even ten count.. or 21 with my shoes off..

    Is there another door to the Studom.. or are you limited to building things that will fit out the trap door system..??

    Doug

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,760
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Gatecliff View Post
    ...........Is there another door to the Studom.. or are you limited to building things that will fit out the trap door system..??

    Doug
    Hi Doug, glad you enjoyed the tour!

    The hatch does open up to about 4'x4' so the limit is not that great, also, I'm in Japan, houses are not that large, and neither are the elevators or hallways to get stuff into the houses, so the 4'x4' limit has not been a problem. If I were to build something like a LARGE entertainment center, I'd just make it in sections.

    Oh yeah.......

    Welcome to the family!

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Beavercreek, Ohio-org from Mendota Heights, MN
    Posts
    27
    Glenn,

    Do you know what software was used to create the drawing of your garage/shop?
    ~Scott

    The grass is always greener over the septic tank.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tellico Plains, Tennessee
    Posts
    4,280
    Stu,
    I just saw your shop tour.. very nice except nearly got dizzy from the camera movements... looks like you are all set for the next A-Bomb... you work in a bomb shelter..lol
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oak Harbor Washington on Whidbey Island
    Posts
    3,118

    Bart's Wood shop

    You can find out most of what you want to know on my web site.

    http://bartswoodshop.freeservers.com/
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    new york city burbs
    Posts
    10,140
    I dont consider my work area a real woodworking shop.
    Its my garage, where I keep alot of electric hand tools, an old ryobi portable table saw, ryobi mitre saw with stand, hand held belt sander, jigsaw, couple battery operated drills, orbital sander, palm sander, biscuit cutter, small 3 inch planer, 2 routers, assorted bits, couple of old tools from people who moved and didnt want them, like an old black and decker circular saw, maybe 25 years old, a sunbeam sander, maybe 40 years old, all work great, boxes of old wrenchs and tools passed down from every relative that moved out of the state or retired.
    I built a work bench, ripped up the masonite cover already, havent changed it yet, and I use temp tables to hold my work since some projects I make are large and I need more room.
    I use my yard when its warm, so my yard looks like an outdoor furniture store, all the time.
    I built a ton of cabinets in my garage so I can store all my junk out of view, keep the tools in it, hardware, and keep all the rest of the garage stuff in there somehow, not to mention I store alot of wood, scraps, whatever.
    Workshop? Not like the ones Ive seen here, more like just my work area, Im no where as sophisticated as most of these people.
    But I love this thread, very interesting indeed.
    I consider myself in the baby phase of woodworking. Im learning how to walk right now.
    Last edited by allen levine; 04-09-2008 at 12:38 PM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,760
    Allen, I hear you, BIG TIME, my first workshop was an area I cleared out in the basement of the liquor shop, and set up my circular saw, upside down screwed to a piece of plywood.

    I did build a workbench, and some shelves, but it was still just a corner of the storage area in the basement of the liquor shop..........

    Found an old pic.......

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Boy, that was sometime ago, April 7th, 2000

    EIGHT years ago, I did not realize I'd had that DeWalt saw for that long


    Anyway Allen, we would all still love to take a tour of your "Work Area", while it may not be a "Workshop" is sounds like you are getting the job done, so it would be good to show others with similar space and use limitations, that you don't need a "Workshop" to do a lot of good work!

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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