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Thread: How much to charge for canle pedistals

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    How much to charge for canle pedistals

    I made these candle pedistals for a priest friend of my son who heard I was into woodworking.
    He absolutely loves them but I do not know how much to charge.
    They took me quite a long time to create, the smaller boxes being made of laminated strips of Oak, the larger ones one piece.
    The wood cost about $120 or so and the labor was a bunch of hours

    I was thinking $250 and he will not balk at that price, but wondering am I undercutting my time and effort?

    Your help would be appreciated.

    Thanks
    Dan
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Pedistals.JPG   Pedistals2.JPG  
    Dan Thibert
    Leominster MA

  2. #2
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    Your Time x $25 + material costs = sell price
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Your Time x $25 + material costs = sell price
    25$ per hour Don? that means 200$ for a 8 hour work day, is that a normal pro woodworker price there? Just being curious...
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  4. #4
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    Having questioned the boat restoration and general contractor guy I buy my lumber from, when I asked him what a talented woodworker would ask per hour, he told me he has to pay 40 dollars an hour to get someone with talent.
    He also said this is a reason its hard to make money.(someone with enough talent to restore a mahogany window and doorway on an old brownstone,someone like you toni)

  5. #5
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    It is always interesting to read how folks determine how and how much to charge for their work.

    Amateurs always undercharge because they fail to or find no reason to be compensated for their overhead. That's OK if you are happy with it. Those who make their living woodworking (or anything else) have to charge for overhead because they want to eat regularly, the mortgage needs to be paid and the utilities companies have a way of turning off their services for non-payment. And there are only 24 hours in a day and seven days on a week. Designs, taking care of the books and taxes, and chasing after materials take time, but then so does doing the laundry, taking care of the property and whatever else.

    So, $25 per hour is less than market value in nearly every state I can think of. Unless there is other income for overhead expenses.

    Hope that helps you, Tony, and others, understand how pricing needs to be determined. As for formulas, nothing beats keeping track of actual costs (ALL of them) and accurate times to determine a 'shop rate'. Then add on an hourly labor rate, a profit factor, and a fair ROI for the money invested in tools and shop. Ten years ago I needed to charge $65 per hour to keep up and I was $15-$25 less than most of my professional competition. That was because I was working from my own property - not paying a lease or rent on someone else's property.

    Computerized spreadsheets saved my tail in keeping track of all this. And I had to take bookkeeping classes and marketing classes so I knew what to do.

    So you see, $25 per hour is not free and clear. Maybe it doesn't even cover the true costs.

    In the end, accept what makes you happy.

  6. #6
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    a better explanation carol, I was just relaying info on what a woodworker expects to be paid,I trust the info the contractor told me was accurate,.I was not thinking along the lines of building a particular piece and how to price it all out.
    when I drive by the home depot in a village called Freeport near me, the latin american workers wait around the parking lots, by the dozens, for a contractor to hire them out for the day. I doubt very much they are getting paid 40 dollars an hour, Id guess more like 75-100 dollars a solid 8-10 hour day.(probably off the books also)and I would not call them untalented, they have plenty of skills, but Im not going into the politics of it all, this site doesnt allow it.

    btw toni, I pay my cashiers anywhere from 7.50 an hour, up to 13 dollars an hour depending on experience.(this is for high school and college students)(minimum wage in NY city is 7.25 an hour I believe right now, just to give you an idea of salary)
    Last edited by allen levine; 10-23-2009 at 08:55 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toni Ciuraneta View Post
    25$ per hour Don? that means 200$ for a 8 hour work day, is that a normal pro woodworker price there? Just being curious...
    It could be hard to maintain a shop and still eat at that rate.
    Tod's shop has copper electric wires the size of a big city water main. I sure wouldn't want his electric bill.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toni Ciuraneta View Post
    25$ per hour Don? that means 200$ for a 8 hour work day, is that a normal pro woodworker price there? Just being curious...
    I actualy charge by the piece anbd generaly realise anywhere from 35-50/hr and I am cheap but the market is down now so I can't get what I should. My shop is in my home and my wife keeps my books so my overheaad is low. I just gave a guy a price on refinishing a table and If I get the job I'll make around 50/hr.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
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    Hey, Don.

    I'm up in Strawberry. We should have a family visit.

  10. #10
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    hey carol i thought the same thing and so me a couple of friends are gonna drop by dons for bit in april
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

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