Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Beading, how do you ...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    38

    Question Beading, how do you ...

    I've been looking at the Pine Cupboard in Ejner Handberg's 'Shop Drawings of Shaker Furniture & Woodenware'. I'm thinking of building this, or a variant. The construction of it seems quite straightforward. That is until you think of how to do the beading on the door panels.

    The door panels are flat panels with a rabbeted edge to fit into the rails and stiles (which are square edged). On the panels, just inside of the rabbet there is some beading that is part of the panel, not attached separate trim pieces. The basic beading can be made using either a router with beading bid or a hand beading tool.

    My question is how can the beading be formed at the corner of the panel. The ideal is to have the beading form a mitered corner, but how. If a router and beading bit is used, running it in both directions, the result is a 'button' that is separated from the intersecting runs of the beading. Same thing with a hand beading tool. The beading could be stopped short of the corner, but then how is the intersection formed.

    I've seen this type of treatment accomplished using separate trim pieces, but I would like to make the beading part of the panel, if that is practical.

    The only approach I've come up with is to form the beading with router or beading tool to the edge of the intersection. Carefully extend the bead to the intersection, to create the inner part of the beading. Then form the outer part of the beading at the intersection with a chisel, plane or knife.

    Any answers, tips, suggestions.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont
    Posts
    425
    If the beading is distinct from the remainder of the flat panel (the panel stays flat all the way to where the bead starts), then it can't be done without the use of chisels or gouges.

    If the panel's run horizontally across a router bit in the vertical axis, the edge of the flat panel will be rounded over to match half the bead.

    If the panel's run vertically across a router bit in the vertical axis, the inside intersection will need quite a lot of manual trimming - the intersection will sweep upwards one radius from the intersection. The outside, too, will need trimming... but that part is EASY.

    Myself, I'd cockbead it. That's a lot easier to accomplish.
    -- Tim --

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ozarks
    Posts
    4,993
    like this?
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	door.jpg 
Views:	54 
Size:	41.1 KB 
ID:	38551

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ed explded.JPG 
Views:	51 
Size:	70.3 KB 
ID:	38552
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    38
    Tod, that is certainly a good way (although your example is well above my labor grade, impressive). What the book shows is the beading being part of the panel, as in the panel detail shown in the attached image.

    I have thought about doing it with the bead on the outside, as you showed, but I've seen several references to the bead being on the inside and part of a single piece of wood. I'm trying to figure how that would be done.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Shaker Cupboard a.jpg  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont
    Posts
    425
    That's pretty much how I visualized it... difficult to get done with a router, impossible without a fair amount of chisel/gouge work.

    Another good way to get it done is with a scratch stock... or two scratch stocks. One would cut the bulk of the bead, getting it all the way into the inside corner. The other - shaped to do a simple roundover with the same radius as the bead - would work the outsides of the corner, and would be used around all four sides before doing the inboard (no pun) half of the bead.
    -- Tim --

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,474
    i agree on the scratch stock.. and keep a steady pressure or yu can go astray.. yu might be able to do most of it on the Router table if yu stopped it back from the corner and do your rabet last.. yu would need to run your beading bit high to allow for the rabet last.. then make a scatch stock to match your bead profile out of a used sawsall blade and a grinder.. and do your corners last..end grain frist clean up on the edge grain
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    outside of Toronto, Ont
    Posts
    183
    The bead on the panel could present a problem because the panel has to float. This means that a gap would be required, but this would be difficult to keep equally spaced all around.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,474
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Brubacher View Post
    The bead on the panel could present a problem because the panel has to float. This means that a gap would be required, but this would be difficult to keep equally spaced all around.
    paul makes a good point here but if yu used space balls that would help maintain some even spacing.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont
    Posts
    425
    That's true - at least the gaps at the ends would match each other, and the gaps at the sides would match each other, but the four may match only once.
    -- Tim --

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    38

    Scratch Stock!

    That is what I meant when I referred to a 'beading tool' in the original post. I couldn't think of the name and the Lee Valley catalog called them 'beading tool'.

    Having 2 scratch stock profiles, as suggested, makes a lot of sense. The router could do the bulk of the edge forming, stopping back of the corners. Then do the outside (round over), followed by the inside part of the bead. That is a plan.

    I had also thought about the need for floating the panel and allowing space for expansion / contraction. The panels would only be about 7 inches wide, so not a lot of allowance would be needed. Still, my thoughts were to have the bead's edge about 1/4 or so from the frame so any movement wouldn't be obvious.

    At this point, I haven't decided how to do it: as described above using a scratch stock, forming the beading on separate pieces and attaching them to the edge of the rabbet, or putting the beading on the frame as Tod showed.

    This is a spring or summer project, so plenty of time to decide and draw the plans. Now its time to think snow and skiing.

    Thanks for all the help on this.

    Dick

Similar Threads

  1. Beading Chisel
    By Dennis Kranz in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-16-2012, 03:06 AM
  2. Scratch beading
    By Rob Keeble in forum Neander Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-27-2010, 01:54 AM
  3. Beading Busy again.
    By Chas Jones in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 06-15-2010, 04:05 AM
  4. hand cut beading?
    By larry merlau in forum Neander Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-27-2008, 12:53 PM
  5. Beading for Travis
    By Dave Richards in forum Designs, Plans and Sketches
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-26-2007, 12:18 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •