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Thread: New (to me) #7 Jointer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
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    New (to me) #7 Jointer

    So, Got it in the mail today. Seems like it's been a workhorse in a past life!

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    The question I have is about sharpening the blade. This looks like it has a bit of camber to it ? Slightly rounded at the edges.

    Is that normal for a jointer?

    Can anyone point me to a good tutorial on sharpening a plane iron with a slight camber?

    Thanks!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia
    Posts
    5,011
    Brent,
    Derek Cohen's site is always helpful to me. The link is for putting camber on a bevel up plane but includes instructions for a bevel down also. Just soak up the knowledge and modify for your #7.

    http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Woodwor...aneBlades.html
    Last edited by Ted Calver; 10-30-2009 at 01:47 AM. Reason: add text

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
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    17,471
    welcome to the plane world and cant add anything to what derek can tellya
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont
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    425
    I don't think I'd tolerate a camber on a jointer iron - it'd be impossible to get a well-jointed surface. A jointer's leavings SHOULD be entirely flat, something suitable for a rubbed joint. A cambered iron can't do that - at best it'd leave a concave surface behind, and two concave surface don't join to each other very well - especially if you're using a glue that's not known for its gap-filling properties.

    Now, for a SCRUB plane, yeah - that'd make sense. Even for a smoother. Not for a jointer, though.
    -- Tim --

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,360
    Tim, That's kind of what I thought. I'm pretty new to handplanes. I mean, sure I've got a couple and I use them for the common uses, trimming, chamfering, but nothing serious.

    I kind of just bought this plane on a whim, thinking it'd be nice to have a big snow show. If I was really going to joint something, I'd most likely use my powered jointer.

    But now that I've got it, and I see how it was setup, I'm wondering if somebody didn't use it as a big long smoother?

    I'll have to see how I want to use it, but it sure is a big ole son of a gun..
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont
    Posts
    425
    Feels good in the hand, though, doesn't it? Years ago a fella gave me a #8 with one corner chipped. Lemme tell ya, after a while that gets to feeling like a LOT of iron to be pushing around. There've been times I've wished for a #7 instead.
    -- Tim --

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,360
    It's definitely a big ole chunk of Iron!

    I turned an old shelf into a project cart this last weekend. It seems so handy, I think I'm going to make a laminated 2x4 top and use the new plane to flatten it. Seems like a good way to get the tool tuned up, learn how to use it, and create a useful piece of shop furniture in the process!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,320
    Pretty much what Tim said...

    I sharpen mine straight across, and just knock maybe 1/64" off the corners at an angle. You want as straight and flat a cut as possible from your jointing plane - that's why it's called a jointer.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,360
    Sounds like a plan. I'm going to do a little tune up on it them and see what I can do.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


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