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Thread: Sturdy Table for tractor implements

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Sturdy Table for tractor implements

    Now that the tractor shed is up, I need to start storing stuff.

    I have two attachments for the front end loader. I have 3 (soon to be 4) rear attachments for the tractor.

    In order to save space, I was thinking that I could store the FEL bucket and grapple on a table, and put a couple of rear attachments under them. The front end loader can hook up to the skid steer implements and drop them on the table without issue - I think

    The table would need to be real sturdy - to hold around 1000 pounds fully loaded, and get banged around somewhat. 12 ft long, maybe 4 ft deep and 3-4 ft high.

    Is this a bad idea?

    Any good table design suggestions? I am thinking 4x4 legs and 2x4 edgewise on top - similar to workbench, but space between the 2x4s so dirt can fall thru.
    Last edited by Rick Prosser; 11-03-2009 at 06:44 PM. Reason: Changed 10 ft to 12

  2. #2
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    Good idea - might need a center set of legs to minimize sagging.

    Should be rugged enough.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    If you've got power down on the loader, the table's gonna' need to carry a LOT more weight than you think! Even if it's gravity-down, I'd add quite a bit of safety factor to the table - ever try to pick up a bucket that's all tangled in whatever machinery HAD been stored under it? Ain't level any more, it's hard to hook up to...

    How about a steel rack for the bucket & grapple?
    -- Tim --

  4. #4
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    Rick, is this so you can store two pieces on the same piece of real estate (ie: stacking them without them actually touching each other? If so, hanging from the rafters, a set of chains for the front end loader. I find I don't take mine off. The rear (3 pt.) implements, I drop in a row outside in one pasture. The more hassle to put away, the less it will be put away correctly each time needed.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

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  5. #5
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    Here is a clunky diagram of what I am thinking. This table would sit in the back of the shed (12 ft wide bay).

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Usually, only one item on the table except when switching from one to the other.

    Tim - yes, Power down, but I would let it settle with gravity (draft) - I would need real sturdy.

    Steel table is plan B

    No table is plan C (actually it's current)

    Jonathan - I have been keeping them outside, but sometimes they sit a while and get covered with leaves, hide snakes, and fire ants seem to like setting up housekeeping. I really hate fire ants - specially if I am focused on getting things hooked up and not paying a lot of attention to where I am standing ...I like snakes, as long as I see them first
    Last edited by Rick Prosser; 11-03-2009 at 07:40 PM. Reason: typo

  6. #6
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    I think it is an idea doomed for failure. Farm stuff gets bumped and clunked so much nothing is ever 'exactly' right.
    If you do try, use steel, lots of it.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  7. #7
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    falcon heights, minnesota
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    rick, here is an idea based on my workbenches. the long front and back cross members, and the center front to back cross member would have to be notched where they intersect. the whole thing is put together with 2x6's and sheet rock screws.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails workbench 2.jpg  
    benedictione omnes bene

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  8. #8
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    My vote is still with the steel rack or table... and with legs MUCH futher apart than you now imagine... unless you can accurately get tractor attachments into much smaller spaces than I can without a whole lot of concentration. Me, I'd bump the heck out of something one way or another, someday... and fold a leg underneath & spill everything & have a big pile of steel to pick up before I could get back to doing what I was doing.
    -- Tim --

  9. #9
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    ozarks
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    i`m in the leave `em on the ground camp.
    hydraulics-n-gravity work well together.......if ya add wood to the mix it usually looses......if ya build "stout" racks out of steel it`ll cost ya dearly.....and if ya knock one over there goes the wall of your new building
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  10. #10
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    Rick
    With all due respect to Tod, I'm in the "everything under cover and put away" crowd.
    You need some surplus warehouse pallet racking. This stuff is commonly used for this very purpose among many of my farmer-clients in my real job.
    The racking comes in different weights, I suggest a corollary to the Larry Rule: Buy it Stout. Check the yellow pages.
    Set your racking up at the back of one of your bays, level and plumb, on a good broad base, maybe some surplus railway ties or treated 8x8s (no concrete floor in your shed, as I recall). Tie the rack into the building. Get yourself a set of quick-attach forklift forks for the tractor for lifting stuff up.
    Finally, put the implements each on their own solid hardwood pallet (the country's full of them) and tie them on with a ratchet strap.
    You're in business!
    Be safe!
    Peter

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