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Thread: My new (old) drill press

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lafayette, Indiana
    Posts
    2,380

    My new (old) drill press

    I've been looking for a better drill press than the cheap lightweight one I currently own. I found this one this past weekend at a auction sale and bought it. I can't find any information on it anywhere (on the web). I looked on OWWM.com as well with no luck. It is a 1976 Continental International Model # DP 14-500, 12 speed, 1/2 HP, 5/8 capacity, MT2. It still has the original motor. I have never heard of this brand before. It was made in Taiwan. It is a VERY heavy machine. I actually racked up my back getting it in and out of my truck. It is a bench mount not a floor mount. About 42" tall total. It appears to be very well made and I have begun to tear it down to rebuild it. The motor and spindle are both very smooth and have gotten even better with a little fresh lube. I'm sanding down the frame and plan to repaint it. I'm not really going for a complete restoration but just want it to look nice. Has anyone ever heard of this brand or know where I might look for information?

    Tom
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1949 resized.jpg   1951 resized.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    583
    That looks like the ubiquitous Taiwanese drill presses of the 70's and 80's that wore any number of badges. I just swapped my Dad an old South Bend floor mount drill press for one of these (mine has a different brand name on it, but it definitely came out of the same factory as yours). The only differences i can see between yours and mine are the name brand, the depth stop mechanism, and the table. Other than that, they're twins. Yours might be a house brand from some now-defunct hardware store, or a small import company that commissioned a cargo container or two of machines that they brought to the states and then sold. It's a fairly generic machine.
    All that said, it's a pretty good one for woodworking and general use. The 15" swing is a good standard size. Any rust on yours looks to be light surface rust. It should outlive all of us.
    Chances of finding any information on the brand name are pretty slim. It's obscure and was likely out of business before the internet came to life.
    Have fun with it.
    Paul Hubbman

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,474
    tom if yur looking for parts take a look at the enco site, they are cones of the same critter.. and even some of grizzly stuff may interchange.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lafayette, Indiana
    Posts
    2,380
    I've been working on tearing this apart for the past couple of days and I have actually been impressed with how well it is made. Very solid!. The rust on it is surface rust and has cleaned up nicely. I'm going to repaint it but I'm not quite sure what to do with the chrome plated parts that have pitted. The handles mostly. I'm not going to the expense of re-plating so I'm thinking of sanding them all off and painting them as well. Tomorrow I hope to take the motor hosing apart and clean it up to repaint it also. So far this has been alot of fun. I do not see anything damaged or that needs replaced. Just some good ol elbow grease. This is a bench model and I have had it sitting on the floor since I brought it home and only last night as I removed the whole head did I find out that it has a build in light. Oh yea..the bulb was burnt out and that will have to be replaced but...I guess I can handle that .

    Tom

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
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    11,833
    Think....green paint.....G7943.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Looks like a good find for sure, on the rust on the chrome parts, I have a little trick for that, I know you are going to say "No way!" but it does work.

    Take the chromed part, and put a good layer of regular white glue on it, let the glue dry, but not to the point where it is hard, it still needs to be somewhat soft. Then tear the glue off the chromed parts, the rust will come with the glue, no kidding, it works!

    >> LINK << here is a link to a TV show in Japanese, but you can get the idea, it does really work!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    583
    About the pitted chrome parts - after you do Stu's trick, i'd simply buff it back to a shine (yep, steel can be polished to a white gleem) and you'll be the only one to know the chrome isn't perfect. Once it's all bright and shiney, apply a clear coat to keep it that way. That will keep the bare steel from rusting or discoloring again for the foreseeable future.
    paulh

  8. #8
    Hi Tom. I believe I just picked up a Continental drill press just like yours (14-500, 12 speed....). Of course it didn't come with any manual but I believe it is 110/220 Phase 1 capable. I would like to switch it to 220 if possible since I have a nice dedicated 220 circuit in my garage. Would you have any ideas of where I could find any manual online that would address this? Many thanks,

    Gary

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lafayette, Indiana
    Posts
    2,380
    Hi Gary, welcome to the forum! This is a great place for information and sharing.
    Now having said that....I have nothing to share with you as I never came across a manual for this machine. I'm sure there are others here on the forum that can help you with wiring though.
    Here is a photo of my drill press after putting it in my new shop a few years ago. I took a small two drawer file cabinet and built a 2x4 and plywood frame around it and set the drill press on top of it. Painted it all up the same color as the drill press and it works out great! It is just the right height plus I have storage underneath it.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    It's not what you achieve in life...It's what you overcome!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833
    Looks good. Hope you are getting good use from it. Although that corner setting looks restrictive to me.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

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