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Thread: I need help correcting a big finishing mistake!

  1. #1

    I need help correcting a big finishing mistake!

    I need help fixing a total screw-up that I did. We had a new wooden front door and side lights installed and stained. But I decided to do the final outside clear coating myself. I put three coats of Minwax Polycoat on and got all kinds of positive remarks from my neighbors. But within 3 months I was seeing a clouding of the finish. That's when I re-read the can to see that it isn't recommended for exterior use. I have read that I need to strip the door down to the bare wood using stripper that has methylene chloride. I have also read that once this is done the re-staining does not often turn out too well. Add to this that I have some lung issues and don't really want to use that stripper.
    Can anyone here suggest a method or a product to help me out, or do I just have to bite the bullet and use the above method?
    Thank you for any input you can give me.
    Bruce

  2. #2
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    whats the chance of having another do it to avoid your lung trouble? sometimes its best to leave some things to the pros, by the time you buy the stripper and try to repair it yourself, you might have another problem arise..check out your area for a furniture stripper and see what they would charge or a local carpenter that does his own finish work..no headaches and it will be done while your away lungs dont heal well
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    whats the chance of having another do it to avoid your lung trouble? sometimes its best to leave some things to the pros, by the time you buy the stripper and try to repair it yourself, you might have another problem arise..check out your area for a furniture stripper and see what they would charge or a local carpenter that does his own finish work..no headaches and it will be done while your away lungs dont heal well
    I think Larry nailed this one

    The only other thing that comes to mind is to live with it, or.................. cringe......... paint it

    Your health is worth a LOT more than a door
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
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    I use metholyne Chloride all the time. I buy it in a product calls Dad's paint,stain remover. It comes with a spray bottle and while it will burn you if you skin comes in contact with it I've never smelled any fumes. Metholyne chloride fumes are heavier than air. That said if you have lung problems as other have suggested you might want to have someone else do it. Not a good idea to take chances.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
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    Thinkin' outside th' box...

    You CAN SAND OFF that finish... if you do, be sure you keep all the sanding dust out of your respiratories.

    You don't HAVE to use a stripper.

    You MIGHT not even have to use a MC stripper - try the same PolyCoat treatment on some scraps of the same wood. Let it cure. Try the "safe" strippers, the ones you're confident won't bother your breathers. You might find one that works - if you do, you're golden.
    -- Tim --

  6. #6
    Find a local cabinet shop with a 38" wide belt sander and have them just "kiss" the door to get it down to bare wood, then start over.

    If they do it right, you shouldn't lose much at all of the door's thickness.

    kreuzie

  7. #7
    Using such chemicals outside shouldn't creat too much problems from the fumes, as the airflow will disapate the problem. As for restaining... Good surface prep will solve that problem. Even sanding and good application should solve the problem.

    More of a pain in the posterior than a problem. Just not what you want to do or care to look forward to... labor intensive but not beyond doing.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Kreuzberg View Post
    Find a local cabinet shop with a 38" wide belt sander and have them just "kiss" the door to get it down to bare wood, then start over.

    If they do it right, you shouldn't lose much at all of the door's thickness.

    kreuzie
    That would work on a flat door, but on a raised panel door it wouldn't gain much ground.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
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    If you're going to try the stripper, outside is the best place & I think that using a respirator would also be a good idea. I believe there are types that have available cartridges that protect from the fumes you'd be dealing with.

  10. #10
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    one easy way to strip with a lot of trouble is get the spray cans of stripper from Homedepot. They work great. Get good coverage. Let it work and then broad knife it off. Clean with vinegar. Start over. Ware a good mask. Of let someone else do it.

    Side note, methylene Chloride if you use it DO NOT WARE A MASK the fumes will get trapped in the mask and that will cause big problems. This kind of stripping requires good ventilation and knowledge of the process.
    Last edited by Dave Hawksford; 12-02-2009 at 03:41 PM.

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