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Thread: One cut too many OUCH!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    One cut too many OUCH!

    I started on this 10 inch sized bowl tonight out of Black Walnut. Boy, this stuff is real hard wood! Anyway, I found that if I kept my tools very sharp I was making progress. I was just about to quit for the evening when I decided to square up a tenon with my skew. WHAM..... it happened so fast! I had my first "major" catch. Finding the correct angle to use a skew has been a learning process for me and obviously I have not gotten it figured out yet. Anyway when the tool caught it somehow smashed my hand into the tool rest and cut me up pretty good. At first I thought I had broken my smallest finger but soon realized that I was still able to move it. I shut off the lathe and went into the house to clean up my hand. Not too much blood but the "meat" on my finger was not pretty. Don't need stitches or anything but it did give me a pretty good scare. So the next couple of nights I will need to research more on the proper angle for the skew. Here's a couple of photos of what I'm working on. I took it off the lathe and went ahead and soaked it in DNA. I have alot of work to do on it as I had only just gotten it to a basic shape. You can see where the skew got caught in the last photo. It tore up the wood as well but I can smooth that out without any problem when I return it to the lathe.

    Tom
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2097 resized.jpg   2101 resized.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Bradford, Vermont
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    The skew is one of the tools I always keep far away from any faceplate work. The other is the roughing gouge, for very much the same sort of reasons. For faceplate work, I use nothing but bowl gouges, scrapers, and hollowing tools.

    It's good to get that first "wake-up" catch - rattles ya up pretty good, doughnut? Hereafter, you'll be a little more watchful of what could happen.

    I had a friend 'bout rip two of his fingers off that way - got a catch on the bottom of a bowl, & it flipped his fingers right in between the bowl & the toolrest. Lucky for him, it stalled the lathe.
    -- Tim --

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Ouch Tom, Glad to hear that you are ok. I think skews are more for spindle work than bowl work. I am sure that someone with more experience can pass on the proper angle for it. I would like to know too.
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  4. #4
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    Dang, that hurt just reading about it. Glad it wasn't worse, but sorry it was as bad as it was.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Watson View Post
    I am sure that someone with more experience can pass on the proper angle for it. I would like to know too.
    For me, the proper angle seems to be about 45º. That's usually the angle it sticks at when I throw it across the shop and spear it into the wall.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Dang, that hurt just reading about it. Glad it wasn't worse, but sorry it was as bad as it was.



    For me, the proper angle seems to be about 45º. That's usually the angle it sticks at when I throw it across the shop and spear it into the wall.
    Oh Ok then I do have the right angle on mine too.
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Catalunya
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    That must have been scary, I'm glad that you still have your fingers although a bit damaged, it could have been far serious.
    Last edited by Toni Ciuraneta; 11-16-2009 at 07:46 AM.
    Best regards,
    Toni

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Harrisburg, NC
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    Glad it was no worse than it was. Probably most of us have done the same thing or worse, having a parting tool blade pulled from the handle and thrown across the shop (not enough clearance allowed), roughing a bowl with a spindle roughing gouge. I agree with Tim about a skew on a bowl…a big no no that may cause a big boo boo.
    If you have a local woodturning club with a library I suggest Alan Lacers DVD The Skew Chisel – The Sweet Side, The Dark Side. He shows why this happens in great detail and with all of the other basic cuts if the skew. Even if you have buy it you can resell it here (or other forums).
    I am still struggling with various tools and most people talk about the angle of a tool, not just with the skew. What about the tool rest height and where the tool meets the wood (10:30? 11:30?)
    Hope to see the completed bowl.
    Mike
    All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent. Thomas Jefferson

  8. #8
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    Glad it wasn't worse. Yeppers, a skew for that task is not best choice. Won't say it can't be done but, as you learned, is inviting a catch.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Tom,
    I shuddered when I first started reading your post... knock on green wood (two raps to the side of the head) I haven't done anything yet to catch and cut any fingers.. I've bruised one or two....

    On the tenon, I know the skew is the wrong tool, but after I get the general shape I want with my bowl gouge, I'll sometimes take the point of the skew and clean the sides of the tenon... light cuts and just to square them up.... better tool is a parting too addressed square to the tenon, but I use a skew a lot of the times..

    The catch that scares me most with my skew and it's happened a couple of times, I'll address the tool to the wood and not pay as close attention as I should... the skew with catch and then shoot backwards out of my hand... a sharp blade shooting through the palm of my hand.... I know the sides aren't sharp, but the blade portion is.... fortunately, I always wear a leather glove on my left hand... those wood chips flying off the turning against my hand are hot and they hurt after a while. The glove is an old deerskin work glove that I've cut the fingers and thumb out of.
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Lafayette, Indiana
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    Well this bowl turning stuff is new to me and I am self teaching myself. I've often wished I could attend a class or two but have not done so. I heard the other day about a local woodworking group in my area. I think I will go see what they are all about and maybe I can find someone closer to me that turns. I think I could learn so much more if I was able to ask questions as I watched someone else work.

    Fingers are pretty sore today but they are still there and I have thought about that many times today while at my job. What if ????
    Thanks for the support guys. Its good to be able to share with others who know.

    Tom

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