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Thread: 100-year old Avey drill press - what fun!

  1. #1

    100-year old Avey drill press - what fun!

    Even though I didn't need it, this hundred-year-old Avey was just too well-made to see it go for scrap. The three-speed Mopar transmission addition is interesting, but will have to go. It does give twelve speeds forward and four in reverse.




    1. Found the patent info http://www.freepatentsonline.com/1388876.pdf Does anyone have any literature or a link to any more info about Avey and/or the Cincinnati Pulley Machine Co.?
    2. This was originally a line shaft drive. What horsepower would be optimum for a #2MT machine?
    3. Anyone have surplus 2" flat belt drive/driven pulleys?
    4. What are the max/min drill diameters for #2MT? Most I have are between 1/2" and 3/4". Where to look for surplus bits larger and smaller?

    thnx, jack vines

  2. #2
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    Wow Jack, that is a beauty!

    I'm not sure, but you could turn, or get turned a wooden, for aluminum pulleys for the flat belt
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    Check http://www.owwm.com and the manufactor index. Odds are good there is info there on that one.

    Also drop in the forum at http://www.owwm.org Be sure and read the rules! They are a crotchy bunch but there is no better source for info.

    Pulleys and belt are available. Just be prepared to be shocked at the cost of flat belts. I ordered one and it was close to a $100. But the good thing is they will out last you with just an little care.

    You can buy a drill chuck with a #2 MT.
    Last edited by Jeff Horton; 11-19-2009 at 01:29 PM.
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  4. #4
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    Very cool Jack. If you take off the transmission and you have a lathe, I've seen a setup that used one for variable speed...just a thought.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  5. #5
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    Hi Jack

    Other then just changing it back to it's original configuration is there any other reason to remove the transmission? I am assuming that you have all the parts & know how they are supposed to be arraigned. Will it be a user or just something pretty setting in the corner?

    If it's to be a user why not just clean it up & paint it & leave the transmission in place?

    I for 1 would like to see a few more pictures of how it is now with a little explanation of whats happening & how it all works. I think it's interesting that someone had the vision & understanding to put that transmission on there & would find it fascinating to see how they went about it.
    Titled a few years in the life of an old Avey Drill-press.
    Last edited by Bart Leetch; 11-19-2009 at 02:39 PM.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
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  6. #6
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    Those old camelbacks are cool. My Dad and i pulled one out of an old building shop. He cleaned it up and put it in his garage. His is an old Buffalo with a 15" swing. The thing's a brute, and it came with 40 or 50 morse taper shank bits. Usually, he just uses a chuck and standard bits. He runs his with some 1-1/4" wide serpentine belt he got from a mechanic's shop. It was used belting replaced during scheduled maintenance. They work very well and should last a good long time. He cut them to length and heat welded it to size.
    As far as motor size, he runs his with a 3/4 hp capacitor start motor. As far as largest drill size you could use, i'd probably limit drilling steel plate to less than 1" diameter. Wood - well you'd be using hole saws and fly cutters up to whatever diameter you felt like.
    Have fun with it.
    paulh

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Vines View Post
    1. Found the patent info http://www.freepatentsonline.com/1388876.pdf Does anyone have any literature or a link to any more info about Avey and/or the Cincinnati Pulley Machine Co.?
    2. This was originally a line shaft drive. What horsepower would be optimum for a #2MT machine?
    3. Anyone have surplus 2" flat belt drive/driven pulleys?
    4. What are the max/min drill diameters for #2MT? Most I have are between 1/2" and 3/4". Where to look for surplus bits larger and smaller?

    thnx, jack vines
    A 1/2-HP to 3/4-HP motor would be about suitable for that drill press, and I'm leaning toward 1/2-HP.

    You can buy flat leather strap from a saddle shop, and it's not at all hard to lapstitch together. I made a flat leather belt for my 1909 Seneca Falls metal lathe; it cost something like $15 to do the job.

    Your selection of bits will be maxed by the motor's HP rating - you should be able to turn 5/8" and 3/4" just fine. The smallest... would be anything you can get. I've seen 'em as small as 1/8" on a #2MT.

    Oh, yes, and... you CAN use a #2MT adaptor to run a conventional Jacobs chuck, too.
    -- Tim --

  8. #8
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    Jack, you don't say where you are located. Would hate to see a family member get injured on an old piece of iron that doesn't stand up to OSHA's approval. So if you are near, would come take that off of your hands just for safety sakes that is!
    That is cool. Someone had a reason for putting that tranny up there. Might try it, it might have been a major improvement even though it isn't "original equipment".
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

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  9. #9
    Thanks to everyone for the replies. Especially thanks to Jonathan for being willing to assume the risk of protecting me and mine from operating such a dangerous piece of equipment. OSHA/WISHA would run screaming and condemn the building it is in!

    Jeff said
    Also drop in the forum at http://www.owwm.org Be sure and read the rules! They are a crotchy bunch but there is no better source for info.
    everything you say is true, very very true. I've been on there for years got some good info there.

    Even though it is work to post it all on different sites, one gets a bit here, a bit there, and the total is far greater than any one site.

    I admit I'm torn between the sheer audacity of the transmission and 5' long V-belt drive, and the desire to get it back to the pure original flat belt state. Either way, I'll post some more photos of the setup. It is certainly entertaining to look at and operate.

    thnx, jack vines

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