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Thread: Buffing compounds ??

  1. #1
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    Buffing compounds ??

    I was out looking at some buffing compounds today and was amazed at how many there are out there. Is there some kind of procedure as to what buffing compounds to use and when to use them?
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  2. #2
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    Here's what you've opened up, Drew...





    There are indeed a bazillion different buffing compounds available. Most of us turners are using one or two different compounds, often followed with wax. In general, we start with tripoli compound, then go to a finer abrasive like white diamond, then carnauba or some other type of protective wax. (I prefer Renaissance Wax myself.) Each of these compounds is applied to dedicated buffing wheels ("charging" the wheels), then the workpiece is held against the spinning wheels. Renaissance Wax is an exception to this...I apply the wax to the wood, the buff it off with a clean, uncharged wheel.

    Here's a video showing the general idea:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUnql9eYV5A

    One word of caution...don't use white diamond on dark, open-pore woods like walnut. You'll get little white specs embedded into the pores and they're about impossible to remove.

    As far as what specific brands to buy or suppliers to purchase from, I've not seen much difference from one brand to the next. I got most of my buffing compounds from Don Pencil, but just about any of the woodworking suppliers will have something similar.

    Don Pencil has also recently introduced what he calls "PL" compound, intended for poly and lacquer finishes. It seems to be somewhere between tripoli and white diamond in abrasiveness. I've had good results using it by itself, or in conjunction with tripoli and/or white diamond.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  3. #3
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    So Vaughn with the beal system on the video they are using a single wheel at a time. I see in LV that they have a three wheel combo. Are there certain benifits to using one over the other?
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  4. #4
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    The benefit to having three on a single spindle is that you don't have to stop to change wheels. The disadvantage is that you don't have as much room around the wheels to work larger pieces. If you're only making pens and bottle stoppers, the three on a stick is a good idea. For me, I wanted them to be separate, so I could buff bigger pieces. I ended up with the Don Pencil set, which is individual 8" wheels and an 8" long spindle that attaches to my lathe. (It's the 8" version of the one he's showing on his home page.) I've buffed pieces up to 18" in diameter, and could go bigger is need be.

    I like having the buffing wheels mounted on the lathe, so I can use the variable speed. I almost never buff in the 1700 rpm range (the speed I'd get with a dedicated buffer motor like that in the video). I'm usually usually closer to 1000 - 1200 rpm range, although for the PL compound I slow it down to about 700 - 800 rpm.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  5. #5
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    Thanks Vaughn that is just what I needed to know.
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Watson View Post
    I was out looking at some buffing compounds today and was amazed at how many there are out there. Is there some kind of procedure as to what buffing compounds to use and when to use them?
    Drew, I think this chart may give you the answers you're looking for:

    http://www.hobbytool.com/jewelers-rouge.htm
    -- Tim --

  7. #7
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    That's a handy chart Tim, although I disagree with its recommended sequence for both acrylics and wood. I use brown tripoli all the time on acrylics, and most of us use white rouge (white diamond) on wood.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
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    I went to LV today and picked up the beal system ( just the single ) and found at KMS Tools a complete arbour with a #2MT arbor built in for the lathe. As KMS have not delivered the stand for the lathe yet ( Still more confusion and only 2 weeks later) The boys here in Victoria are making it up with some good deals on the extras that I want. The arbor is great as it gives lots of space between the work and the head stock. Check out the pics. Also was trying to get that stunning gloss finish on the work but have not yet. Any tips on what i am doing wrong or not enough of?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails lathe arbor 002.JPG   Buffer trials 001.JPG  
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Watson View Post
    I went to LV today and picked up the beal system ( just the single ) and found at KMS Tools a complete arbour with a #2MT arbor built in for the lathe. As KMS have not delivered the stand for the lathe yet ( Still more confusion and only 2 weeks later) The boys here in Victoria are making it up with some good deals on the extras that I want. The arbor is great as it gives lots of space between the work and the head stock. Check out the pics. Also was trying to get that stunning gloss finish on the work but have not yet. Any tips on what i am doing wrong or not enough of?
    What're you buffing with (in terms of compounds)? The last buffing really should contain 100% pure carnauba to fill any last nagging teeny scratches & give you a wet look.
    -- Tim --

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Hofstetter View Post
    What're you buffing with (in terms of compounds)? The last buffing really should contain 100% pure carnauba to fill any last nagging teeny scratches & give you a wet look.
    Hi Tim I am starting with the Tripoli wheel and then using the white diamond finishing off with the carnuba wax. It all came with the Beal buffing system but it could be that I am not spending enough time on certain wheels or not enough pressure, maybe not enough sanding or not fine enough grit? I have never done this before so it is all new to me. I applied tried and true linseed oil and beeswax a couple of days ago to the bare wood before doing anything and maybe that is the problem. All advice positive and negetive is appreciated
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

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