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Thread: What is historical?

  1. #1
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    What is historical?

    Where I live in northern Arkansas, we are fortunate to have many natural wonders at our doorstep. One of them is a large, managed, forest with streams and a beautiful river. About 15 years ago, one side of the forest was cut off from the other when the bridge over the river was declared unsafe and closed. It has not been replaced because a group interested in historical preservation want it kept for reasons only they understand. Now, after all these years, it will officially come up for consideration to be placed on the National Historical Registration books. That means it will never come down. One side of the forest is cut off from the other denying people the enjoyment of driving, walking, or riding on horseback or ATV through some of the most beautiful country you can imagine. My thinking is that people being able to enjoy the forest is more important than keeping a rusted old bridge just to keep a rusted old bridge. Not everything old is historical.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  2. #2
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    It's still historical, but it may not be "significant".

    Are they interested in rebuilding that bridge, or just maintaining the status quo - letting it slowly rust into the landscape without tearing it down?

    Is there any decent chance of putting in another passable bridge farther along the river so folks can cross again?
    -- Tim --

  3. #3
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    unfortunatly i have seen similar things in my area, and they leave it and it goes away and the only ones that get to use the other side are those that are brave enough or fit enough to go across the obstical..which is in my opinion wrong. the bridge should either be repaired or another access made. or they will take and cut away the timber on the other side and leave a shell to block the veiw of what the state has done.
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  4. #4
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    My guess would be the 'bridge preservationists' aren't really. There is a small segment of the population that believe man is a cancer on the planet and love to have the opportunity to deny men, especially those riding on or in machines, access to nature. It happens a lot in the west with 'roadless areas'. IMHO it's just a way to deny access to people who either don't have the time or physical ability to take a 3 day hike into the mountains. Now stepping down from soapbox.
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  5. #5
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    I'm one of those people who used to take the three day (or more) hikes into the backwoods. It's different once you get more than a half day's hike from a trail head or road (the distance someone can do in a day hike). The trash disappears and there's less "worn in" trails. You're more "in nature".

    Of course, there's more danger. If you get hurt two days out, there's no one to pull you out, so you have to plan better and consider all the possibilities. I remember hiking in the Sierras in the very early spring. In the morning, you could cross the streams fairly easily, but in the evening, they would be running strong from the sunlight on the snow further up the mountain. You'd have to wait until morning to be able to cross.

    Going to some campground with a trailer that's plugged into the electric grid is not "camping". There's no physical exertion, no danger, no contact with the forces of nature - it doesn't even require that you learn anything about the area you're going to. It's just suburban living in a different place.

    So, yes, I want places that are roadless, where I can take a compass and topo map (or GPS these days) and go off on my own, or maybe with one other person, and I won't hear the sound or gasoline engines, or see all the trash that people leave behind. And I hope more people will try real camping and experience what it's like to live close to nature for a week or so with nothing but what's on your back.

    Mike
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 11-23-2009 at 08:33 PM.
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Hofstetter View Post
    It's still historical, but it may not be "significant".
    Tim's note is key. Recently a bridge in Point Marion, PA was imploded and a new bridge built. The original was on the register, but not deemed important enough to save. Most of the "significant" structures have been rehabilitated, re-purposed, or moved. As others have suggested, I wouldn't be surprised to find ulterior motives in this case. Then again, I've been wrong before!

    Wes

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Hofstetter View Post
    It's still historical, but it may not be "significant".

    Are they interested in rebuilding that bridge, or just maintaining the status quo - letting it slowly rust into the landscape without tearing it down?

    Is there any decent chance of putting in another passable bridge farther along the river so folks can cross again?
    That would require a whole lot bulldozing, blasting and etc. to build road parallel to the river to get a new bridge in up/downstream. Current bridge is on the road, only logical location for a new one.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rennie Heuer View Post
    My guess would be the 'bridge preservationists' aren't really. There is a small segment of the population that believe man is a cancer on the planet and love to have the opportunity to deny men, especially those riding on or in machines, access to nature. It happens a lot in the west with 'roadless areas'. IMHO it's just a way to deny access to people who either don't have the time or physical ability to take a 3 day hike into the mountains. Now stepping down from soapbox.
    Rennie nailed it.
    New ATV usage regs have some trails one-way but dead end in forest. Others come out on roads but riding on the roads is prohibited. Guess who had more pull with the Forest Service people.....
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  9. #9
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    No offense meant Mike. It would certainly be nice to go up into the hills for 3 days, but not all of us can. I do take my truck up into the mountains following old fire roads, etc. Yes, the silence can be broken occasionally by the sound of another truck or ATV, but, at least here in Idaho, people are pretty good about packing out their trash. There are different ways of experiencing nature. One way should not be considered superior to another, just different.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rennie Heuer View Post
    No offense meant Mike. It would certainly be nice to go up into the hills for 3 days, but not all of us can. I do take my truck up into the mountains following old fire roads, etc. Yes, the silence can be broken occasionally by the sound of another truck or ATV, but, at least here in Idaho, people are pretty good about packing out their trash. There are different ways of experiencing nature. One way should not be considered superior to another, just different.
    I agree. I just want to see some roadless areas, as well as areas with roads.

    Mike
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

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