Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    bethel springs TN, but was born and raised in north east PA
    Posts
    3,132

    ?

    I just started ruffing out my blanks using a parting tool.It seems like i can ruff them out in no time doing it this way. Is this something others are doing or am i nuts? The birch one on the lathe only took me about 2 minutes to get it to that point as the pic shows. The cherry one(the biggest with the hole) took a little longer,but the oak was about the same as the birch. Should i just keep doing them this way or should i stop as it could be dangerous?
    Thanks as always.
    Steve
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 015 [800x600].JPG   016 [800x600].JPG   017 [800x600].JPG   019 [800x600].JPG  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tellico Plains, Tennessee
    Posts
    4,352
    I can't say yay or nay on whether to keep doing it, but if it works for you why not... you may have more potential for a catch with the parting tool.. but since haven't tried it myself, can't say there either.
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,472
    i am not a turner steve as yall know but int he construction trade,, that idea works for cuttin recess in stair stringers.. only thing i would say to do is knock off the pieces by hand first to eliminate most of the big chucks gettin caught and grabbing your tool.. that way you can ease into the rest for smoothing and not have a inch long chunk that could go at one time..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont
    Posts
    425
    That's not BAD. Less wood pulverized, less steel sharpened away, less time roughing... win-win-win. It may be rough on the parting tool, though, since it's not built for long reaches & heavy pounding. Now I may hafta' experiment with making a heavy short-ended parting tool that clears the ribs, just for bowl-blank roughing. The parting-tool tip wouldn't need to extend much more than about 1/4" from the tip of the clearing tool.
    -- Tim --

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Ogden, Utah
    Posts
    348
    Without watching you do this, this is just a guess. But what I think you're doing is using the parting tool like a very small narrow scraper. It's the same principle as the Ci1 type of tool. The difference being that the Ci1 is much more stout and made for that and the thin parting tool runs the risk of a catch or grab and breaking it off. Because the parting tool has such a small cutting or scraping surface it's easy to control. I wouldn't say you shouldn't do it, but there are better tools for the job.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Salt Spring Island, BC Canada
    Posts
    2,070
    Seems like just adding another step in the turning process to me. A very dangerous step. You are still having to use your roughing gouge to clean it up and with the extra time doing it with the parting tool how much time did you really save and at what risk? A good sharp gouge will make short work of roughing as that is what it is designed for. Just one bad catch in a big chunk like that with a parting tool could be very dangerous I would think. Not something I would promote doing just from the safety stand point. I have seen lots of guys injured in my days of working construction with "it seemed like a good idea at the time" thinking.
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    1,103

    ?

    Stephen,

    I agree with Curt. In principle, it is working much like a "Bedan" tool as well, but the Bedan is much stouter.

    Why not try to get one of those? I think your parting tool will thank you.

    I have a friend over here that seems to like using his parting tool for other than its designed functions, with pretty good results, too. Not absolutely Kosher, but, like you, it works for him.

    Aloha, Tony
    Last edited by Tony Baideme; 11-29-2009 at 05:07 PM.
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

    Registered voting member

    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,832
    I will not address the "nuts" question except to point out what kind of company you keep here.
    Whatever works, works. Methinks, as Curt mentioned, you could use the Ci or similar tool instead.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    bethel springs TN, but was born and raised in north east PA
    Posts
    3,132
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Fuller View Post
    Without watching you do this, this is just a guess. But what I think you're doing is using the parting tool like a very small narrow scraper. It's the same principle as the Ci1 type of tool. The difference being that the Ci1 is much more stout and made for that and the thin parting tool runs the risk of a catch or grab and breaking it off. Because the parting tool has such a small cutting or scraping surface it's easy to control. I wouldn't say you shouldn't do it, but there are better tools for the job.
    Curt i have tryed other tools and yes they do work. not trying to promote this way just curious if anyone else has tryed it. All i'm doing is running the tool in to the wood just like a parting tool is made for.

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Watson View Post
    Seems like just adding another step in the turning process to me. A very dangerous step. You are still having to use your roughing gouge to clean it up and with the extra time doing it with the parting tool how much time did you really save and at what risk? A good sharp gouge will make short work of roughing as that is what it is designed for. Just one bad catch in a big chunk like that with a parting tool could be very dangerous I would think. Not something I would promote doing just from the safety stand point. I have seen lots of guys injured in my days of working construction with "it seemed like a good idea at the time" thinking.
    No Drew i don't use the roughing gouge at all. it also don't throw those big chunks at my left hand.I go stright from that to my bowl gouge.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Baideme View Post
    Stephen,

    I agree with Curt. In principle, it is working much like a "Bedan" tool as well, but the Bedan is much stouter.

    Why not try to get one of those? I think your parting tool will thank you.

    I have a friend over here that seems to like using his parting tool for other than its designed functions, with pretty good results, too. Not absolutely Kosher, but, like you, it works for him.

    Aloha, Tony
    Tony i heard of this from a guy at the local aaw demonstration i went to.He is a very accomplished turner and he does demos all over the south.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    bethel springs TN, but was born and raised in north east PA
    Posts
    3,132
    [QUOTE=Frank Fusco;191870]I will not address the "nuts" question except to point out what kind of company you keep here. Frank that's what keeps me coming back knowing i'm not alone.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •