Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: wood inlay

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Puyallup, WA
    Posts
    330

    wood inlay

    I'm looking for advice on how to simply insert a wood inlaid cross in the top of a box. If anyone is aware of any jigs or techniques that would facilitate the process I would greatly appreciate being pointed in that direction.

    I've included a picture of something approximate to what I'm looking to accomplish.

    Thanks in advance.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails wood cross.jpg  
    Last edited by Peter Lyon; 12-01-2009 at 05:25 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Villa Park, CA
    Posts
    1,407
    The easiest way is to use a small router, like a trim router, then clamp a board as a guide on the wood (in the right location) and run the router against the board to get a straight cut.

    Move board to make next cut, or use two boards, one on each side and just move the router between the two until you cut all you need to. Use a chisel to square the corners.

    Of course, you don't want to cut too deep. If you're using wood inlay and not veneer, plan for maybe 1/16 to 1/8". The piece you inlay should be a bit thicker so you can reduce it and not the field wood.

    If you want to do it by hand, still use the guide board but make a cut with a knife along the board first, then use a chisel to drive downward. Do it on both sides, then chisel the center out. If not deep enough, you don't have to use the guide board any more, just use your cut as a guide. You can use a router plane to get the bottom flat.

    It's really not too difficult. I much prefer the powered router approach.

    Mike
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Puyallup, WA
    Posts
    330
    Do you have a recommendation for which type of router bit will give the cleanest cut?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Villa Park, CA
    Posts
    1,407
    A spiral downcut bit will probably give the best edge. If you can't find a spiral downcut, look for a straight bit with three cutters, rather than two.

    Most trim routers have a 1/4" collet so the bit probably won't be bigger than 1/4".

    Mike

    [Here's a spiral downcut 1/4" bit.
    [Here's one from Rockler.]]
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 12-01-2009 at 05:25 AM.
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    falcon heights, minnesota
    Posts
    5,609
    what about a combination of the 2 methods? route out the waste, then trim up the edges with a chisel?
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Villa Park, CA
    Posts
    1,407
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Noren View Post
    what about a combination of the 2 methods? route out the waste, then trim up the edges with a chisel?
    You could do it that way, and I've used that technique for odd shaped pieces - say a leaf or the petal of a flower.

    But his inlay is so simple, just straight lines, that a router guide is probably the easiest way to do it.

    One thing to watch out for is the center "points" - the four corners in the center. You need to think about the rotation of your router bit and not try to cut all the way to the corner if the bit might cause tear out. Do the cut cross grain first then do the cuts along the grain.

    If you want to play it safe and don't cut to the corner, use a chisel to finish the cut.

    Also, making knife cuts at your borders before routing will help.

    Do some sample cuts on scrap first and you'll learn a lot.

    Mike

    [Added note: you can make the inlay first, then do the routing, or route first then fit the inlay piece. I usually make my inlay piece first and tape it in position. Then use a knife to outline the piece. If it's complex, I use the router to waste out the center but leave the edges to be done by hand with chisels and carving gouges (for round places).]
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 12-01-2009 at 04:55 PM.
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lake City, Florida
    Posts
    498
    Peter, I've used this with good success in the past.....

    http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/200...side-9500.aspx

    The cutout is made using a template and the bushing with ring attached. Then the inlay is cut using the same template without the ring on the bushing. The cutout and inlay is made from the same template so you get an exact fit.

    You can use regular brass bushings if you can figure out the proper combination of offsets. The proper combination of offsets is dependent on the cutter size.

    Tony

    Tony, BCE '75

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Puyallup, WA
    Posts
    330
    Thanks everyone for the information provided so far.

    Just for giggles and grins, how would you make an inlaid cross like the one shown in the picture below? I understand how to use the router bushing that Tony linked to with a supplied template but how does one go about creating their own pattern if they don't own a scroll saw (or have the talent to use one even if they did ).

    Does anyone have any experience contacting someone with a CNC to cut out a pattern?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails budded.jpg  

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Plainwell, Michigan
    Posts
    4,855
    Contact Pete Simmons, he has done some incredable stuff with Vaughn on inlays using lasers

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,319
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Lyon View Post
    ...how does one go about creating their own pattern if they don't own a scroll saw (or have the talent to use one even if they did )...
    Fret saw? Coping saw?
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

Similar Threads

  1. Wire inlay wood turning
    By Rich Soby in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-10-2011, 01:19 AM
  2. String Inlay
    By Stuart Ablett in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 12-17-2009, 03:53 PM
  3. Inlay help
    By Jim Burr in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-08-2009, 08:32 AM
  4. inlay kit
    By Eduard Nemirovsky in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-15-2008, 10:21 PM
  5. 1st Inlay
    By Ed Nelson in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 08-14-2007, 01:10 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •