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Thread: Lathe options

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Escondido, CA
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    Lathe options

    OK, I have heard from the Nova users and a few non-users.

    It is only fair to ask what lathes you might suggest in lieu of the Nova DVR XP.
    I have limited shop space (10'x10'), so a relatively small footprint. I can add mass. Power supply is not an issue. I want variable speed, and reversible at the minimum. The ability to add bed length is good. A swing away tail stock is something my back would love! I liked the outboard turning ability but it is not a deal breaker. Cost is at the very bottom of my list but I do not have inexhaustible funds! I want what I what for teh best price I can get.

    Don't we all?

    So, other than the Nova, what would you suggest?

  2. #2
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    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
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    Eager

    Carol,

    I eagerly looked at your thread to get all kinds of info. I got here too early...no posts yet.

    I shall return!

    Enjoy,

    Jim
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Salt Spring Island, BC Canada
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    2,070
    Hi Carol, Yea I know I will not mention the Nova. Here in Victoria lots of the guys in the turners Guild have Stubbies and one fellow just upgraded from the Nova to a stubbi. Oneway is another great lathe and one that I had looked at getting as well as it is Canadian made with a baldor motor. I have never heard anyone complain about a Oneway yet. There was talk about a new lathe coming out of Europe I think it was called a Triton ( no not the router) . It had great reviews acording to the guys in the Guild. I have looked for it on line but I might haver gotten the name wrong. Maybe someone else here knows about it.
    Daily Thought: SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKIES..... NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS...............

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont
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    Carol, what sort of swing are you looking for? 10"? 12"? 14"? 16"? 24"? Measured American-style, that is - diameter instead of radius as the English do.

    Got a preference for bed length? Limits as to machine weight?
    -- Tim --

  5. #5
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    Mar 2007
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    Escondido, CA
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    Tim - no real preference on swing. If it supports outboard turning then thats a mute issue. Bed length, short, but adjustable with extensions.

    That said, most wood available to me in Arizona is not real big. And my interest lies mostly in boxes and minis - at the moment! Probably flavored by having the Jet mini.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    When I bought my lathe it came down to either the DVR XP or the Powermatic 3520B. I went with the Powermatic for several reasons. It has more mass and bigger swing, and I like having the tool rest supported by the lowered extension bed for doing outboard turning (after sliding the headstock to the tail end of the bed). I'd used a cantilevered "outboard" tool rest on my old Craftsman, and although I'm sure the Nova version is much more stable, I still like the idea of having substantial support directly below the tool rest.

    With the extension, I have 53" of bed in the upper position, or a handy side table in the lower position (if I'm not using it for the tool rest), or I can remove it completely if I want a smaller footprint. Swing-away tailstock attachments are available for the 3520B...I think Robust even makes one for it.

    The motor is a fairly standard issue (and thus replaceable if necessary) and the controller is also pretty much off-the-shelf technology, which should help prevent future obsolescence.

    So far, I've had no regrets for purchasing mine.

    That all said, I suspect you'll be very happy with any of the lathes in that class. Powermatic, Oneway, Nova, Stubby, Vicmark, and all the others in that neighborhood are all fine machines. I wouldn't kick any of 'em out of my shop.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  7. #7
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    Oct 2009
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    For your use, since you're not talking about a need for anything huge but you have more than a Harbor Freight budget, I think the Nova 1624-44 is a pretty darn good option:

    http://www.teknatool.com/products/La...va%20_1624.htm

    I like the amount of iron they put into the Nova lathes, and the fit's good & the machining's nice, and they run really well.

    VicMarc makes nice lathes, too, but they seem to be a little hard to buy on this side of the Big Blue Wobbly. At one time I was all primed to buy a VicMarc, but got distracted by a Harbor Freight instead.
    -- Tim --

  8. #8
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    Carol, my dad got a Jet 1642 about 4 months ago and it is a GREAT machine. It doesn't quite have the swing of the mustard, but then the price is less as well. Lots of places have sales on them from time to time. My dad got his for right at $1800 and is quite a happy guy. The tailstock, while stout, isn't that bad to take on and off either.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  9. #9
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    Schenectady, NY
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    I'm with Jeff

    I have had a Jet 1642 for many years and love it. Lot of bang for the buck and pretty small foot print. I think it is one of the best values out there for full size lathes. I have not had a single problem with mine yet. I've done everything from tiny birdhouse ornament perches to a 12" x 36" solid white oak ship winch on it. Electronic VS and sliding headstock is really all you need.
    Don Orr

    Woodturners make the World go ROUND

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Goodland, Kansas
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    Carol when I got my Nova DVR I turned on one and also turned on the Jet 1642. I really liked them both. What it came down to was a smaller footprint and yet had the swing away bed extension if needed. Right now it works slick for me because I can slide the tailstock onto the extension and then swing both out of the road if needed. I would have been happy with the 1642 because the headstock slides to the end of the bed which made it a moot point for turning larger items. I would have been very happy with it also but again footprint is what I needed.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

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