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Thread: drilling a 14" hole with a 10" drill

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    drilling a 14" hole with a 10" drill

    I got myself into a bit of a bind with a lamp project I am working on. (pics later, I have a reason to hold back for now)
    The upright part is 14" tall. My longest 3/8" bit is 10". I hand held and eyeball sighted for the first part feeling pretty good about myself going (I thought) right down the center. Then I attacked from the other end, planning (hoping ) the two would meet dead-on. No way, not even close. Now I know from all my foolings around with old style guns that drills, especially twist bits, like I was using, like to follow grain instead of going straight. That's what happened here.
    So, I ended up buying a set of 14" spade bit. (much better for this type work, BTW) I then attacked the hole from the deep end and 'voila' drilled all the way through.
    Problem solved. Not.
    This bit found the 4" deep hole, flexed and continued on through.
    Now I have a curved hole, first goes one way then goes the other.
    Question is: how do I shove a rigid lamp rod through a curved hole?
    Right now, I'm thinking I won't. I might just use short sections at both ends and Gorilla glue them in place. But other suggestions are welcome.
    BTW, for further lamps, I plan to keep length (height) to drill length available and drill before turning then use end holes for my centers. This might not be a 100% method but sure should be better.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  2. #2
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    I'd be tempted to use the spade bit to "straighten" the hole. Of course in the curved sections will be larger than the rod diameter, but I don't think that matters.

    Maybe a forstner bit on a bit extender would work too?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Schultz View Post
    I'd be tempted to use the spade bit to "straighten" the hole. Of course in the curved sections will be larger than the rod diameter, but I don't think that matters.

    Maybe a forstner bit on a bit extender would work too?

    I am considering using the 3/8" spade to just kinda chew away at the interior to enlarge and straighten the hole. Dunno if that would work.
    Problem with extender is that the extender is too big to fit inside a 3/8" hole.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Bradford, Vermont
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    Boy, are YOU hosed!

    That one's gonna' be difficult to fix. Did you get it to meet in the middle, somewhere? If you did... pick up the smallest hole saw you can find, and a piece of 1/4" cold-rolled steel rod long enough to fit (get forced) through. Take the pilot drill out of the hole saw & attach it to the 1/4" steel rod.

    Now... I never said this would be EASY... in fact it'll be nearly heartbreaking to do... but it can be made to work. The hole saw WILL try to follow center as much as possible, but you'll have to stop at least every hole-saw-depth to clear out the "doughnut hole" with a spade bit.

    It may take two runs, the second one to straighten the bore more than the first did, if your meeting point is a long way off center.
    -- Tim --

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    ..... I might just use short sections at both ends and Gorilla glue them in place.
    Seems the easiest option to me, gorilla or epoxy, through tubes are not the norm in the UK, just a 5/16" hole right through and bulb holder fixing in the top.

    I use a homemade drill but that's just because I'm too tight to buy commercial.

    __________
    __________Made up the Auger to go with the hollow centre.
    __________8MM drill brazed to a length of 5/16" mild steel rod.

    __________click on images for larger view
    _________ ___
    Chas. just a traveller on the road of time.

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  6. #6
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    Epoxy a short section of threaded rod at the top to mount the socket and harp. If you need a metallic part at the bottom, do the same thing.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  7. #7
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    Tim: That is essentially one plan. I could sharpen the sides of the spade bit and chew away. Or do like I did with a gun one time. I just took a section of steel rod and whacked on it with a chisel until it was a non-directional burr then chewed away with a drill.

    Charles: I do wonder why the tube is the norm. A cord inside a solid lamp is not in danger. Having the right too, like yours, to start with is the wisest approach. And, I have never been accused of being in that category.

    Bill: Right now, that looks like the most expedient solution.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  8. #8
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    Yep, I'm thinkin' a mixture of Charles' and Bill's suggestions is the thing to do at this point. Nobody but us'll be the wiser, and we ain't talkin' much.
    -- Tim --

  9. #9
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    Frank I sent you a PM with a link. Wasn't sure I could post it here. I buy a lot of my parts for lamps from CSUSA, the big borgs, etc. CSUSA has instructions and also got some from a place a friend of mine gets his parts from. I don't use a brass tube all the way thru. I just use a piece at the top and will use a little epoxy if it is slightly loose. I do all my lamps that way. See what you think Frank.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  10. #10
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    One technique I've read for doing long holes is to rip the blank in half, then use a dado or router table to cut a channel right down the middle and then glue the two pieces back together. If you do it on a band saw, or a think kerf blad on the table saw, you should be able to get a nearly invisible glue line when you glue it back together, since the grain will match pretty closely.

    Not saying I've done it, but I've read about it, fwiw...
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


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