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Thread: What is the best way to accomplish this?

  1. #1
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    What is the best way to accomplish this?

    I am building some rocking horses for a couple of the neighbors kids. One of the parts is a wedge that is used to attach the legs to the body at a 12 degree angle. The wedges are 5 inches long, 3 inches wide and vary in thickness from 3/4 at the thick end to 1/8 inch at the thin end. My shop is pretty well supplied with all the basic woodworking tools. Unfortunately my band saw is too small to cut the piece. I would appreciate any suggestions for cutting these parts since I will need to make quite a few of them. And no, these rocking horses are not centipedes. I just have to make a lot of rocking horses.

  2. #2
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    Kevin do ya have a table saw, those would be bretty easy to do on a table saw.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Kevin do ya have a table saw, those would be bretty easy to do on a table saw.
    It might be a challenge to safely make a 3" deep taper cut on a 5" long piece of 3/4" lumber.

    Kevin, I'm assuming this is the cut you're trying to do?

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  4. #4
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    Vaughn:

    That is exactly the cut I am trying to do. I do have a table saw but I cant figure out how to make the cut safely. One idea was to hot melt glue the blank to a longer board and to use the longer board to push the blank through the table saw.

    What I have been doing is making cuts every quarter inch from the side up to the cut line and then cutting close to the cut line with the band saw. This leaves a pretty rough surface that then requires a lot of sanding.

  5. #5
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    what about making a jig to do the clean up with a router? rough cut on band saw and clean up with router pattern bit
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    what about making a jig to do the clean up with a router? rough cut on band saw and clean up with router pattern bit
    I think you might have hit on a solution...how about a sloped router bridge? Something like this, but on an angle:

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  7. #7
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    Band saw it and hand plane it. Cleaner, quieter, quicker, and you have to do enough of them to become really real accomplished with a hand plane. Opportunity is knocking on your door.

    Not to brag but I am pretty accomplished with a router, but I could plane half of these in the time it would take to make the jig.

    Stu? Point this man in the right direction.

  8. #8
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    Got a jointer? Tapers are pretty easy to cut accurately on the jointer. Cut the taper on the end of a longer piece of stock, then crosscut it off to cut the next taper. You can do both ends before you cut off.
    -- Tim --

  9. #9
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    So many good ideas. My thought is to try them all out and see what works easiest. A friend suggested the hand plane but Im not sure I have one small enough since these are only 3" x 5".

    Im kind of partial to using a router and a jig because I like making jigs of all sorts.

    Tim: I know how to make wedges when I dont want them on the jointer but Im not sure how to do it intentionally. Is the idea to take a long piece of stock that is the correct width and pass 90% of the stock past the blade on the first pass, then 80%, 70%, 60% ...... etc. to make the wedge. Then when I get close to the final thickness flip the board around and do the same on the other end. Then cut off both ends and repeat? I have an 8" wide jointer so if made my raw stock double the width of the final piece I could cut each wedge in half using the table saw and double the number of wedges.

    What do you folks think. Guess Im going to get some shop time tonight.

  10. #10
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    The jointer technique for making wedges is simpler than that, even. Here's what ya do:

    The finished wedge will be 5" long, right? So make up a little push block with a heel only 1/8" tall (because the narrow end of the wedge is 1/8" thick).

    Mark out your wedge shape on the board, with 1/8" at the end and 3/4" at 5". Draw the wedge profile right on the edge of the wood so you can see it while you're jointing. Make a mark at the 5" point.

    Use a strip of masking tape (blue, since it doesn't leave residue) on the jointer's fence directly above the cutterhead's centerline to show you where that centerline is.

    Set your jointer's depth to whatever depth you can comfortably take off in one pass (1/16", 1/32", whatever you're comfortable with).

    Lay your stock over the cutterhead, with the 5" mark directly in line with the masking tape. The bulk of it should lie on the OUTFEED table, overhanging the INFEED table on the 5" end. Line up the 5" mark with the masking tape.

    Hold your board down and start the jointer.

    Now tip up the long end of your board (over the outfeed table) until the 5" end barely touches the infeed table. Using your push block, run it through tipped up like that. It'll take off stock in a wedge shape, with the thickness removed at the narrow end equal to your depth setting.

    Back it up & take another pass, exactly the same way. Continue repeating until the end is 1/8" thick.

    Take one final pass to clean up the tiny step you made at the 5" mark. At this point you should have a very good wedge, 5" long, 3/4" thick at the 5" mark at 1/8" thick at the end.

    Here's what you're doing:
    -- Tim --

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