Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Homemade splitter

  1. #1
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    711

    Homemade splitter

    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 08:10 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    29,083
    Looks good. Allen. Any pics showing how it's attached?
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    711
    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 08:10 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Punta Gorda, Florida
    Posts
    902
    Good job Alan. What kind of metal did you use? I made a short one for my Uni out of aluminum so that my Gripper would go over it and it works good but if I make a taller one I am wondering about the flex. Using regular metal I would have to protect it from rust. I guess that stainless steel would be the way to go and I have some plate but it is so tough that it is hard to work with without the proper tools. I might give it a go anyway.

  5. #5
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    711
    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 08:10 AM.

  6. #6
    Nice looking splitter Alan. Its kind of nice to work with other material from time to time, but also challenging. It's also nice to be able to make, fabricate or machine your own tools, or at least make your existing tooling better.

    You are absolutely right that you can use your bandsaw to cut aluminum. In fact you can also cut brass with it to, and you don't need any special blade. You get better results cutting soft metal with a special purpose blades when using tablesaws, Radial Arm Saws or Crosscut Saws naturally, but they will still cut it.

    Its kind of neat where I work. I am a machinist by trade, but its building super yachts so I get to marry steel and wood together. Mostly Stainless Steel though, some aluminum and a bit or brass. My current job is to put a 1/2 by 1/8 inch piece of stainless steel trim around a groove milled into the edge of all the granite countetops, circular stairs, cabinets and coffee table. With over 300 feet in all, with all the inside joints being coped by using files as its too tight a radious to do on my milling machine. Its quite the job and is scheduled to take me the next 4 months to complete! I am looking forward to it though.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ill.
    Posts
    57
    Good job!! Looks good and safe too!!

  8. #8
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    711
    Last edited by Alan DuBoff; 02-27-2008 at 08:10 AM.

  9. #9
    I work with a guy that is a true blacksmith. He made a lot of ornamental iron for high end homes in the DC area and really knows his stuff. He wants to get me involved in it. I got quite a bit on my plate now, so starting a new hobby is really not in the cards, but someday I hope to pick up blacksmithing and foundry work. I think it will really help my wooden models take shape, and he thinks so as well.

    The thing of it is though, blacksmithing and being a machinist are really at odds with one another. Blacksmithing is more rounded, visual related work, while machinists work hard to keep things straight, precise and flat. Neither one is wrong...or for that matter, better than the other. It's just very different.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  10. #10
    Alan I made one for the Oliver a bit ago, made one for Joe B, out in cali also. made it out of stainless. Cut it at work with a plasma cutter and ground the edges flat. It raises with the bald and actually is attached to a brackett that is connected to the motor itself. It is hooked like a cutting cycle and follows the curviture of the saw blade radius. When I attached it I bent it a little like a slight "S". Now when I run a board through the saw not only will it keep the wood apart, it also pushes the wood into the fence. It works out great. I will have to get some pics this weekend when I can get back to the shop.
    Working wood is the same as working metal really. The differenc is you work it slower and use different tools. I know lots of machinest that are wood workers and vise versa.
    Reg

Similar Threads

  1. Now That's a Wood Splitter!
    By Dan Mooney in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-18-2012, 03:35 AM
  2. Grr-Ripper and MJ Splitter
    By glenn bradley in forum Jigs and Fixtures
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-17-2010, 12:57 PM
  3. TS splitter
    By Jeff Horton in forum Jigs and Fixtures
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-09-2007, 10:24 PM
  4. Splitter Safety
    By John Whittaker in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 02-23-2007, 03:50 PM
  5. Log Splitter
    By Tyler Howell in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 01-24-2007, 12:04 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •