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Thread: 1950's craftsman table saw Mod#113.27520

  1. #1

    1950's craftsman table saw Mod#113.27520

    I am looking for the extentions for the rack and pinion fence. Does anybody know where I may able to find them? Or am I just going to have to change the fence system on this saw? I want to build a saw station for this saw with wing extentions and outfeed table. I would like to keep the factory fence as it works well and is solid. Any information would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    That'd be this saw?









    It's pretty doubtful you'll be able to find factory rail extensions for it, but you MIGHT POSSIBLY get lucky. It looks like they wouldn't be at all hard to make, though - that looks like about 1/2" x 1-1/2" aluminum bar stock.

    EDIT: It looks like the factory-original rail extensions didn't continue with rack teeth; they were smooth-bottomed:



    That's probably because of the difficulty in getting the racks to line up precisely enough to not jam at the transition points.
    Last edited by Tim Hofstetter; 01-08-2010 at 03:51 PM.
    -- Tim --

  3. #3
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    You may watch for one on CL but you could wait for a long time. One of the problems with this fence was after years of use they get so they don't grip at the back end of the fence even with adjusting it. I have my Dad's gold anniversery addition which now has a newer 1997 Craftsman fence system on it. I suggest the Shopfox fence.

    http://grizzly.com/products/The-Shop...rd-Rails/G8826
    Last edited by Bart Leetch; 01-08-2010 at 04:04 PM.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  4. #4
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    I have one of those. Grandpa bought it new. It is stored in the overhead right now. An after market fence addition would be your best bet IMHO. The saw table is thicker and heavier than many of today's saws and the trunnions are more substantial as well. I would focus on the core saw body as original and add modern attachments. Mine is destined to be used as a second saw when I get around to it.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    I have one of those. Grandpa bought it new. It is stored in the overhead right now. An after market fence addition would be your best bet IMHO. The saw table is thicker and heavier than many of today's saws and the trunnions are more substantial as well. I would focus on the core saw body as original and add modern attachments. "Mine is destined to be used as a second saw when I get around to it".
    So Glen how are you going to arrange the saws. Side by side or facing each other or 90 degrees to each other over a common out-feed table?

    I think I want to do the 90 degree thing when I get into a bigger shop. This is with an older right tilt Unisaw & the Left tilt Craftsman should make a good combination.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
    So Glen how are you going to arrange the saws.
    Blatant thread-jack . I am thinking about the 90* setup too as the contractor style motor mount will be a challenge. Another idea is reversed side by side with a permanent 90* motor mount below the saw body. My focus for this saw would be a sled/crosscut station so I would like it to be where the sled could stay on it but I doubt the floor plan will allow that.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  7. #7
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    Far as I'm concerned, side-by-side is the best way to do it - with one or two common wings in the middle. I've got a pair of GZ440Zs set up that way, with the right-hand saw dedicated for crosscuts (no need for an outfeed) and the left-hand saw dedicated to ripping (got two tilt-top stands for outfeed right now). That way the left (ripping) saw serves as a work support for the right (crosscutting) saw. I've got the long rails, which bolted up nicely to both saws as one unit, with a common fence (although I seldom use the fence on the crosscutting saw).
    -- Tim --

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    ok tim,, you need to show pics of this arrangement for all to see,, and dont worry about the clutter it just shows its used
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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  9. #9
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    old craftsman saws

    Well,you may want to try sears. I have a old radial arm that I was able to still get parts for I was suprised to learn that they had them in stock.

    I also have a sears & roebuc table saw #101.02144 it has a blue craftsman lable that dosent have the rack and pinion just the sliding type.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    ok tim,, you need to show pics of this arrangement for all to see,, and dont worry about the clutter it just shows its used
    Why, surely, Shirley.

    Here is said arrangement... and while I'm at it, I might's well show ya a li'l more of my shop areas.

    The twin saws... out of sight to the left is the shaper & the 12" miter saw.


    If ya squinch a little you can see three of the router tables...


    You can BARELY see the tip of the drill press, just to the left of the mill/drill...


    Jointing/planing area (the white one in the middle is a Foley/Belsaw planer... The big compressor is to the left of the 6" jointer.


    Turning area (three wood lathes, one teeny metal lathe) in the basement... Grinder station is on the left.


    The larger 1909 Seneca Falls "Star" metal lathe...


    The big knee mill...


    Two of my three spare (obsolete to me) table saws.
    -- Tim --

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