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Thread: work space

  1. #1

    work space

    Hey I was just wondering how I should start woodworking. I bought a book of a bunch of simple things I can make with saws and drills but I am not sure of the best work space.
    What is the easiest and an efficient place to work?

    thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
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    Well, if you have a garage or a basement that would be a place to start. Dan Noren works out doors, all his tools are on wheels. Idealy you want a dedicate space as large as you can get. I have heard of folks who work on their patio.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    it all depends.............a person can drive a 63 plymouth to the grocery store as well as they can drive a rolls.
    what do you plan on building and with what tools?
    what space do you have at your disposal? (working in a one bedroom apt is different than sharing a garage with the wifes car.)
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  4. #4
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    Faraz,
    I see from your previous post that you are a highschool student living in Alberta. Does your parent house have a basement. If not ask them if you can use a portion of the garage. I made a lot od furniture with just the basic tools before moving up to a full blown shop.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
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    583
    I think this is one case where "necessity is the mother of all invention" is really the case. I'd start with figuring out how to make the space you have work best for you. My shop is in the basement because i have nowhere else to work. However, even if i did have a garage, i'd probably still be in the basement because of the cold winters.
    Make sure you've got some decent lighting and enough electricity to power the tools you need. I know people who do great work in a converted spare bedroom. I know people with incredibly equiped shops that never come close to getting the full benefit of their investment. Remember that it's the craftsman, not the tools that make fine work.

    Some sort of work bench is usually a given. I've got a decent bench, but have done quite a bit on saw horses or a Black & Decker Workmate.

    I'd buy only the tools you need for the project at hand, and keep in mind that there are several ways to do any given task. It may be worth while to pick up a tool that is very versatile or will get frequent use. For instance, depending on what you're doing, a drill press or table saw may be a great purchase, but a thickness planer or mortising machine might not be a very practical purchase.
    I'd start simple and work up over time. For one thing, you'll probably gravitate towards certain types of woodworking. As you do that, you'll know more specifically what might suite your needs best.
    Also, i always advocate buying used equipment if you can find it in decent shape for a reasonable price. With a little homework you can get very good tools at a huge savings over new. And, if you later decide to upgrade or get rid of it, you can generally sell them for what you bought them for. That's simply not possible when buying new.
    Have fun with it.
    Paul Hubbman

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Hubbman View Post
    I know people who do great work in a converted spare bedroom.
    When LOML and I were first married we had a 2 bedroom apartment. I used the spare bedroom. It was ok but boy when it came time for sanding and finishing it was realy a pain. Thats when I knew I had married a keeper when she silently suffered through it.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    falcon heights, minnesota
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Dan Noren works out doors, all his tools are on wheels.
    once again, for the pic police...

    i can truly boast that i have the world's biggest shop. good ventilation, heat, a/c, you can't see the walls, the ceiling is painted blue, and the only drawback is when someone trips the sprinkler system...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails my workshop.JPG  
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    NorCal, USA
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    I made a four poster bed when living in a 900 sq. ft apartment with a 6’ X 12’ deck, where I worked. I got a Craftsman Workmate (google it to see a picture) that I used as a work space. When I needed a larger surface, I got a 2’ X 5 ‘ piece of ¾ ply and glued and screwed a 2 X 4 lengthwise down the middle and clamped that in the jaws of the Workmate. When you are done, it folds up to about 6” thick. This also works great as a wallpaper glue up table. It is my junk collector in my shop now

  9. #9
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    Aug 2008
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    Dan, does your shop have a nice fluffy thick white carpet now?

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    falcon heights, minnesota
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    pretty much hunkered down in the garage these last few months. but i went back out to the shop yesterday, it was too nice to be inside.
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

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