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Thread: best saw choice

  1. #1
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    best saw choice

    I am wanting to set up a dedicated saw and fence system to cut wide high profile molding at a 45 degrees. I want precise clean accuracy. My question is what style saw do you all feel is the best as far as blade deflection, arm movement and bearing tolerance. A radial arm saw, miter saw or sliding miter saw. Any brands stand out??

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken lutes View Post
    I am wanting to set up a dedicated saw and fence system to cut wide high profile molding at a 45 degrees. I want precise clean accuracy. My question is what style saw do you all feel is the best as far as blade deflection, arm movement and bearing tolerance. A radial arm saw, miter saw or sliding miter saw. Any brands stand out??
    IMHO none of the above. The radial arm saw can have deflection to to the cantiliver of the saw the the miter saw has a problem due to the angle of the arc as you drop it down the slider stands a better chance then the other two but my first choice would be a dedicated TS. Once set up and tuned I think it would give the most consistant cuts.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    after thinking about it more the slider would have the same problem as the RAS. So I'm sticking to the TS with a dedicated sled.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
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    I have a sled set up for my table saw. I guess I was wondering about not having to move the molding. Looks like that would help.

  5. #5
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    The down side to a table saw will be keeping a 16 foot piece of trim on a sled.
    But if your cutting shorts It would work fine.
    If you ask the guys that have one of these http://www.festoolusa.com/products/s...und-miter-saws They will tell you there is nothing better. I don't know about them and I am still trying to figure out why it is twice the money as all the rest.
    I should add that I have cut one or two crown moldings over the years and have yet to cut them on any thing but a miter saw.
    Last edited by Chuck Thoits; 01-21-2010 at 03:32 AM.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  6. #6
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    re

    Chuck I kinda had the same thoughts. It just seems that if the trim stayed stationary it would be better. But then you are at the mercy of how accurate the saw is. Also one advantage of the table saw would be that it would have more horse and torque so to speak to keep the blade from flexing. In my opinion that is one fault of the compound saws They are a little weak for the blade size. You have to exercise good technique to keep the blade up to max rpm. Watch the blade flex when powering up or down. Slight but it does tend to flex. Have you noticed this or am I seeing things?

  7. #7
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    While I've cut my share of trim with my CMS and suffered through the deflection of the RAS I have not used a slider. I base my opinion on the sucess I've had cutting miters on my Table saw. I think with an adaquate infeed you could get good results with the table saw.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
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    Ken on some of the cheaper blades I have seen flex. Or when the blade starts to dull. I have also seen this with a table saw. It seems to be more common with the 10" blades than the 12s. I would say that it is more the technique than the tool. No matter which tool you use for the job find the thickest blade you can compound cuts will put some side load on the blade.
    I have not found any of the 12" miter saws I have used to be under powered.
    8" and 10" ones yes but not 12"
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  9. #9
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    Why not get a saw that get's it close, and use one of those trimmer thingys to fine tune the cut to perfection?

    Something like this maybee... http://grizzly.com/products/G1690

    If precision is what you are looking for, I'd guess thats why they use this type of thing for picture frames. The only problem is if it doesn't work with the height of the molding you are looking for...
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  10. #10
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    Ken If your seeing flex on start up I would say you ether have an inexpensive thin kerf blade or bearing issues with the saw.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

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