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Thread: SCARF JOINT

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    SCARF JOINT

    I am a little on the frugal side and sometimes use a Stopped, Splayed, Keyed, and Doweled Scarf Joint if I don't have a piece of 2 by 4 or such the right length. I realize its a timber framing joint and I like to make wood joints, besides to me it adds character to a piece and modern Woodworkers just look at the joints in wonder and scratch their heads.

    Does anyone else do this?

    Last edited by Jr Strasil; 01-23-2007 at 03:43 PM.
    Drawknife, Spokeshave, Plane, Rasp; Decisions, decisions.
    Old tools are all very MODERN, they are all CORDLESS.
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jr Strasil View Post
    I am a little on the frugal side and sometimes use a Stopped, Splayed, Keyed, and Doweled Scarf Joint if I don't have a piece of 2 by 4 or such the right length. I realize its a timber framing joint and I like to make wood joints, besides to me it adds character to a piece and modern Woodworkers just look at the joints in wonder and scratch their heads.

    Does anyone else do this?
    Jr, I think there're a lot of things you do that most of us never even attempt. The odd time I've had to make a scarf joint it was beveled, nailed and glued - and perhaps a little prayer for good luck

    Don't worry, I was never in the house framing biz so it's not like anyone's life depended on it.

    It's great that you're keeping the traditions alive, Jr.
    All the best,
    Ian G

    **Now holding auditions for a catchy new signature**

  3. #3
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    S E Nebraska
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    I know its almost invisible but if you look at difference in wood color on the long support in the forground of my bellows stand you might be able to make it out. Sorry I don't have a close up to show. Its a bit different joint but still a scarf.

    Drawknife, Spokeshave, Plane, Rasp; Decisions, decisions.
    Old tools are all very MODERN, they are all CORDLESS.
    By Hammer and Hand All Arts Do Stand.

  4. #4
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    Dec 2006
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    Wake Forest, NC
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    I can't see it, but wow what a bellows!

  5. #5
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    Minneapolis/Grand Marais Minnesota
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    Live Like You Mean It!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
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    I haven't used that type of joint...yet I assume the dashed lines in the sketch are the dowels?

  7. #7
    I have used this type of joint before. My father once made a indoor swimming pool using 8 by 8 beams. On some of the plates, we used this scraf joint. It was a pain to make, and probably was a bit sloppy, but we did use it.

    I am a machinist, but at work where we build high-end yachts, the carpenters use this type of joint all the time. recently I saw them use a crap load of scraf joints in the making of the gunwale. It was made of teak, about 3 inches thick (but rounded in a oval shape, and flared from aft to forward. At the widest part it was perhaps a foot wide. A nice piece of woodwork that is for sure, and the scarf joints had to be perfect as well.

    I am not trying to take any thunder away from anyone here, I am just amazed at the detailed joints that can be made between two pieces of wood.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

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