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Thread: End Grain Flooring?

  1. #1
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    End Grain Flooring?

    I have an enclosed porch, with a crawl space underneath, standard construction with 2 x 6 walls and 3 sliding glass doors, with a floor area 10 x 15. My question is......has anyone here tried making their own end grain flooring. I have seen other sites that do it for a living but when I have emailed them since they are just asked for information on how to do it I have never recieved a response which don't surprise me. My thoughts at this point is to get seasoned dry walnut logs approx. 4-6" and slice them into 3/4" slices and make my own tiles. Anyone ever tried this on this site? Thanks for any info.

  2. #2
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    are you talking end grain like a parquet floor? i would think they would be brittle end grain sliced to a thin thickness doesnt have much strength..the parquet i have seen commercially was flat grain.
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  3. #3
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    I've seen it in stamping plants but its thick blocks--just guessing maybe 6x6x6 blocks. Been a while since I was in a stamping plant.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Meiser View Post
    I've seen it in stamping plants but its thick blocks--just guessing maybe 6x6x6 blocks. Been a while since I was in a stamping plant.
    That's what I've seen, too. 5 or 6" thick (long) blocks stood on end.

    The ones I've seen were loose - not fastened to one another - and laid over a concrete slab. That's so they could be removed easily for re-configuring the machinery.

    Generally, they were heavily oil soaked, too.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  5. #5
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    I don't think it would be any differant then an end grain cutting board. When I make en I make the pices about and 1 1/2 thick.
    Last edited by Don Baer; 02-27-2010 at 06:03 PM.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
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  6. #6
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    My guess would be that they would prone to checking or splitting, unless you back them up with ply or masonite
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    Toni

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  7. #7
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    Here's a link to onme company that offers then and they'll even sell you a sample for $20.00. might be a good way to go, get the sample and see how they make it.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
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    Don, that is one of the sites I wrote to and never recieved a reply. If you check through their site at one point they have some mesquite peices, about 8-10" in diameter, laid down and it is simply beautiful at least to my eyes. The peices are just like an end grain cutting board. They are glued down to a plywood subfloor with a rubberized wood glue then a grout mixture is made up of the sawdust and polyurethane and the voids filled. Most floors are made of square or rectangular blocks but since I will be doing it out of logs there would be a large amount of voids so I would need peices anywhere between 1 1/2" to 6" in diamater. I seriously believe this would make an absolutly beautiful floor. With the light sapwood then the dark heartwood all laid on ends. I was just wondering if anyone else has tried it. http://cobbledwoodfloors.com/
    Tried posting a link to one site but don't know if I did it right or not

  9. #9
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    I seen them making one version on one of the TV shows several years back. They were using old barn wood and basically making tiles out of it. Then these tiles were epoxied together, sanded and moves to site. It sees to me as if they were in the 1-2 inch length but it a pretty vague memory I have of the process.


    I have also seen a lot of the industrial versions in machine shops, in fact the plant I worked at in Kansas City had close to 70 acres of it at one time back in the 50's and thousands of square feet of the stuff left when I hired on in the 70's. The shop floors were usually 2x4 pieces and I am not sure how long(thick) but they were oiled and anything but pretty. Saved a lot of parts that got dropped though.
    Garry
    Last edited by Garry Foster; 03-01-2010 at 02:32 AM.

  10. #10
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    Quite awhile back I visited the cheverolet plant in Brookpark, Ohio, yes they had the block flooring and its purpose was to soak up the many oils that are present in a shop like that. With all that oil that floor will last forever. One of the members here sent me a very informative site that talks of acclimation of the product and the humidity of the room. Since this is actually a 3 season porch that does have one register for heating and cooling, I think it still might work. So far this winter the temperture at its lowest was 52. Guess I will actually have to wait to see what the summer is like before I can decide wheather to go thru with it or not. Checking and cracking will happen, no way around that, but once the voids are all filled with a grout mixture it should be minimzed then once the top coat is applied it should slow the cracking wouldn't you think?

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