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Thread: I spent an hour trying to find an answer to this:

  1. #1
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    I spent an hour trying to find an answer to this:

    Hi Everybody,

    How do you get your lathe tool back into the SAME position when you use a Jet (and probably a Tormek) Slow Speed Sharpener?

    When I sharpen a lathe tool and then sharpen other lathe tools, I don't seem to be able to come back to the first tool with an accurate sharpening angle. I am sure one, or more, of you FWW people have solved this problem. However, I cannot find your post.

    Please clue me to the type of Jig that you invented. If for no other reason than I spent some serious time this afternoon trying to invent one without success. I am begging, groveling, etc.

    Thanks and Enjoy,

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 03-31-2010 at 04:14 AM. Reason: Clarification
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
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  2. #2
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    I use the same settings on the jig itself, so that never changes. To set the bar that the jig rides on, I just put the gouge in the jig and adjust it by eye, sighting the side of the wheel to get the bevel to match the wheel. I also often color the bevel with a black Sharpie, then when I think I have the jig support adjusted right, I hold the tool (in the jig) to the wheel and turn it an inch or so by hand...just enough to grind away the black mark. You can quickly see if the wheel is hitting all of the bevel that way.

    Tormek also has a jig-setting tool, the Turning Tool Setter (TTS-100) that can be used in conjunction with their gouge sharpening jig. I haven't used mine yet, because I'm not using one of the Tormek pre-designed gouge profiles. When I got the Tormek, I just found the jig setting to duplicate the profile I was already using on my gouges and set the jig support by eye. Once of these days I intend to regrind my gouges to one of the Tormek grinds (which would actually be a very slight change from what I have now), just so I can use the TTS-100.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  3. #3
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    What I do with my carving gouges is hold them in my right hand, using my index finger as a stop against the tool rest, and I do not release that grip at all during the bevel grinding, I can look at the bevel, cool down the tool on a glass of water and continue grinding without changing the angle.

    No jigs needed, only a bit of care and not to change the way you're holding the tool against the tool rest.

    Hope this helps.
    Best regards,
    Toni

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  4. #4
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    Toni's comment made me realize that I assumed you were using a jig. Are you using a jig or free-handing it? I use the Tormek gouge jig and like I said n my previous post, I always use the same settings.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    A question for you Vaughn:
    While I'm not familiar with that jig that you mention, I've seen the wolverine jig which IMHO has a drawback; as one rests the end of the handle of the tool against a stop to get the bevel angle, if one doesn't adjust that setting the resulting bevel angle will be different each time one sharpens a tool due to the shortening of the tool together with the wear of the grinding wheel.

    Am I right or I'm missing something? As I said I'm not familiar with those jigs.
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  6. #6
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    Don't know about the two you mentioned. With the Wolverine, I simply eyeball the angle and set. I believe that is really quite an accurate way to do it.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toni Ciuraneta View Post
    A question for you Vaughn:
    While I'm not familiar with that jig that you mention, I've seen the wolverine jig which IMHO has a drawback; as one rests the end of the handle of the tool against a stop to get the bevel angle, if one doesn't adjust that setting the resulting bevel angle will be different each time one sharpens a tool due to the shortening of the tool together with the wear of the grinding wheel.

    Am I right or I'm missing something? As I said I'm not familiar with those jigs.
    Toni, you are somewhat correct. Although the wear of the grinding wheel is minimal, the jigs do need to be adjusted over time to compensate for the smaller diameter. This is really not much of an issue, though. In the case of the standard Wolverine jig, as you mentioned, the end of the handle is used as the reference. Unless all your turning tools are exactly the same length, you'll be adjusting the jig for each tool anyway. There's another Wolverine jig used for swept-wing gouges, the VariGrind. It is set by referencing off the tip of the tool instead of the end of the handle, so the changing length of the tool is not an issues with it...only the slowly-changing wheel diameter. With either jig, once a tool has been shaped to a profile you like, there's really very little wear to the wheel at each sharpening. It only takes a few seconds to touch up the tool edge.

    Remind me when you're here and I'll show you the basics of how the Wolverine style jigs work, and also the Tormek jigs.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    Hi Everybody,

    How do you get your lathe tool back into the SAME position when you use a Jet (and probably a Tormek) Slow Speed Sharpener?



    Jim
    I don't use a slow speed grinder for lathe tools. I have my tool rest on my regular bench grinder set to the angel I I like and once it's been ground it is only a few passes to touch it up.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toni Ciuraneta View Post
    A question for you Vaughn:
    While I'm not familiar with that jig that you mention, I've seen the wolverine jig which IMHO has a drawback; as one rests the end of the handle of the tool against a stop to get the bevel angle, if one doesn't adjust that setting the resulting bevel angle will be different each time one sharpens a tool due to the shortening of the tool together with the wear of the grinding wheel.

    Am I right or I'm missing something? As I said I'm not familiar with those jigs.
    If I'm thinking of the right jig one has to adjust the tool handle cup each time the tool is ground and for each tool ground.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  10. #10
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    Vaughn,

    Do I understand correctly---You are using the same angle on all of your wood lathe tools (bowl gouges, spindle gouges, skews)?

    With my home made Wolverine copy I can come back from the lathe, do a touch-up and go back to the lathe in about 2 minutes. This is true as long as I am using the same tool. With the fake Wolverine I have only one white wheel on a 1725 RPM grinder. It does touch up the edge with great accuracy. However, going from roughing gouge to spindle gouge does take a bit of time and patience. My one stone does not leave the finish I desire.

    The Jet Slow Speed Wet Grinder leaves a beautiful edge. However, (you knew there would be a however, didn't you?) it takes me 10 or 15 minutes to get the tool back where it was. Heck, I'm 84. In 10 or 15 minutes I could forget what I was turning.

    For doing a skew, there are no stops, detents, or whatever in the holder. The holder is just two plates that tighten on the WT tool. No settings for how much tool sticking out, or side-to-side positioning, or in and out positioning. The tool might as well be in my hand with no jig.

    Enjoy,

    Jim

    More to come COX cuts me off if I dally.
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 04-01-2010 at 05:25 AM. Reason: Left a letter off of the end of a word
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
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