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Thread: Danish Oil Not Curing?

  1. #1
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    Danish Oil Not Curing?

    I have a natural-edged bowl that was finished with a couple coats of Watco (natural color) Danish oil. Looked great...I hand-rubbed it with white abrasive pad for a satin finish after it cured. A few weeks later, I did a small repair to the bark, and sanded a small area of the finished bowl. Two nights ago, I finally got around to touching up the Danish Oil where I had sanded. I wiped some on, let it sit a few minutes, then wiped any excess off. I left the piece in the 55º to 60º shop.

    Fast forward to today, and the spots where I applied Danish Oil are still sticky to the touch. I used the same can of finish that I used previously, and it's only about 6 to 8 months old. I can't figure out why it hasn't hardened more quickly. Previous applications from the same can have been dry to the touch in 24 hours. Any ideas about what's going on? Did the finish "turn" on me? Should I just give it more time to cure? (I've brought it into the house in hopes the higher temps will help.) Should I cut my losses and just take off the sticky stuff with mineral spirits and use another finish?

    Any suggestions are welcome.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  2. #2
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    Vaughn, I'd give it another 24 hours in the warmth of the house, 55-60 degrees is a little on the cold side, or you could send it over here. It's in the 70's to 80 this time of year...
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    The only thing that comes to mind is that you picked up the can, dip the rag and put it on. Never string the oil so that's all you got oil no varnish to harden.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Thoits View Post
    The only thing that comes to mind is that you picked up the can, dip the rag and put it on. Never string the oil so that's all you got oil no varnish to harden.
    It's a can with a screw-off top, so it wasn't really dippable. I shook it gently, and poured small amounts onto a piece of paper towel, so I think it was pretty well mixed. Good advice, though.

    I think I'll do what Don suggested and give it another day or so before I take any drastic measures. Fortunately, there's no deadline for me to get this one done.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Thoits View Post
    The only thing that comes to mind is that you picked up the can, dip the rag and put it on. Never string the oil so that's all you got oil no varnish to harden.

    Thanks for the wake up Chuck. I know its obvious to you but i think i may have been guilty of this mistake. Would this happen with wipe on poly too.

    My experience with poly has been that it dries very quickly. Then for the first time tried the wipe on stuff and it seemed to take forever. Did dry in the end but i thought i would be able to apply more coats a lot faster than i did?

    Oops sorry for the hijack Vaughn.
    cheers

  6. #6
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    When you have a product with te finish soaked in and dried it is much harder for the finish to grab on and dry if loaded on. A good way of applying and touch up coat or any coat really is to make sure the oil is mixed good then take a drop of oil and touch your palm then with your palm rub the oil in till it your palm begins to grab the surface. You can do this about 4 times a day. When you have the touch up area back to the finish of the entire piece rub the piece down with a white 3-M pad maybe use a little comet and turps mud with it and then apply a finial coat with your palm , The finish product I think you will like.

    BTW, I would use 100% Hope's tong oil instead of Danish.
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
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  7. #7
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    Good stuff to know, Dave. Thanks for the suggestions.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
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    Dave's explanation reminds me of my experience wet sanding with Bush Oil over initial Bush Oil application over last summer. The piece took a long, long time to stop being tacky. So long I thought I'd screwed up and gave up on the project.

    Fast forward to Rennie stopping by - I showed him the piece in question and lo and behold, it was properly dry then, so the project is back on the table.

    Anyhow, maybe I used too much oil for the wet sanding.

  9. #9
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    Just a quick update...the Danish Oil cured after being in the house overnight. It looks like the cooler temps were the cause of the problem. Interestingly, I used Formby's Tung Oil finish on a couple other pieces that same night, and they were dry to the touch the next morning, even though they were left in the cool temps of the shop just like the Danish Oil piece.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  10. #10
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    Formby's Tung Oil has little tung oil and more driers. LOL
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

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