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Thread: Welding

  1. #1
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    Welding

    I have little (very little) experience with welding and one of my clients wants me to weld the hinges to his doors to the metal door frames.

    This is a common practice here so I was thinking that it might be a good idea to buy my own machine instead of borrowing from my cousin. So I was wondering what would be a good machine to get for small jobs. And also more importantly I would like it to be a little easier to use than what I am using now.

    Right now I am using a machine that is basicly 2 car jumper cables and a sparkler. I dont know how else to describe it. 1 cable clamps to the work and the other holds the sparkler. It is a PITA to use.

    Is there any hope?
    Last edited by Allen Grimes; 01-28-2007 at 05:31 PM.

  2. #2
    Steve Clardy Guest
    What you have is a stick welder.
    You probably need a portable wire welder.

    [Never heard of welding hinges to the door frames ]

  3. #3
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    Allen,

    What type of metal are the hinges and door frame? If they are just plane old iorn or steel you can use something like this. These types of units are very easy to use. http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...8739_200318739

    If they are stainless steel or some other material that requires a sheilding gas you will have to go for a more complete welder.

    Stick welders are very difficult to use unless you weld all of the time, especially if you want it to look good as well as getting a good weld.

    I hope that links are acceptable here. I guess that I should read the rules again.

    Allen
    Last edited by Allen Bookout; 01-28-2007 at 10:52 PM.

  4. #4
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    Wire feed welder with either flux core wire or inert gas sheilding (not as good for outdoor work, wind will disrupt the sheilding and give you a really bad weld). Kinda like a hot glue gun for metal. Lincoln, Hobart, and Miller all make relatively inexpensive models. Look for a higher duty cycle if you want a better unit, and spring for a nice big extension cord if you need one (like about 14 to 12 awg), less voltage drop means a better weld.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for asking this question, Allen. I've been thinking about the possibility of a small welder myself. (I could find several handy uses for a glue gun for metal.)

    I know zippo about welding. My experience is limited to running about a foot of bead 30 years ago with a stick welder and a couple inches of bead with a portable wire welder a couple years ago. I didn't know you could use a flux core wire. So does that do away with the need for gas in a portable wire welder?

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Bookout View Post
    ...
    I hope that links are acceptable here. I guess that I should read the rules again.

    Allen
    For the record, links here are fine. If you have a commercial interest in the site you link to and don't make it clear, you're probably gonna get a talking to, but links to other sites are OK.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
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    Well, I'm not a weldor, but I do use my welder a lot.

    For what you are talking about, I guess a 110V-120V system (household current) would be fine, and the machine that Allen points out is a good one, with one small caveat, it does not look like it can be set up for a gas bottle.

    I have the Hobart Handler #175, this has been replaced by the #200, but it is basically the same machine. Mine runs on 220V-240V. It will do everything the 110V units will do, and much more, I can, with some bevel grinding, weld 1/2" thick plate, not as well as a cranked up stick welder, but I can do it. For me, this is a better set up, but I do not plan to take it anywhere and do any welding, if I was going to make it portable, I'd get a 110V unit.

    Flux core wire Vs gas shielded wire.

    As someone mentioned, you don't need a gas bottle to weld with flux core wire, it has flux in the wire, (the core of the wire is flux) and as the wire is zapped, this flux burns off, making it's own shielding gas. I works well, but is messy compared to using just mild steel wire with a sheilding gas. Also, as John mentioned, the flux core works much better outside, as even a little wind can blow the shielding gas away from you weld, which is no fun.

    My set up, with a gas bottle, well actually two bottles, can also run the flux core wire. If you buy a machine that is only flux core, you will not be able to go to gas shielding. Some machines come with the ability to expand to shielded gas welding, this takes requires you buy a gas bottle (or lease it) and a regulator for the bottle.

    Why go gas shielding?

    Well, I can weld steel, stainless steel, aluminum, and even titanium if I want to

    The Handler 125 comes ready to weld Flux Core, and can be upgraded to weld MIG (with the convertion kit)

    Here is a factory reconditioned unit for $260 Hobart Handler 125 <-link

    If you are doing this really really part time, I'd still suggest you stay away from the really cheap units, they work, but they will frustrate you more than anything. I've found that I have used my welder way more than I had every dreamed I would, I think that once you have one, and you see that is really is like a hot glue gun for mild steel (and boy is it) you will find a lot of uses for it, and the MIG (with the shielding gas) is just so much nicer, almost zero splater to clean up and while the Flux Core is way cleaner than the old sticks welding it does require cleaning between running beads, where as the MIG set up does not.

    Being able to weld stainless is REALLY nice too, I don't do it much but boy is it nice when I have to, for this I use the CO2 + Argon mix, they recomend a tri-mix of CO2+Argon+Helium, but I did not want to buy a third bottle. I use the Argon for welding Aluminum, that is nice to be able to do as well (I don't know if the Handler 125 does Aluminum..?)
    Last edited by Stuart Ablett; 01-29-2007 at 01:08 PM.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post

    I have the Hobart Handler #175
    Same here....great welder for my uses. I used a stick welder as a kid growing up on the farm and I thought that was easy to use...but not nearly as easy as my wire feed welder.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ash View Post
    Same here....great welder for my uses. I used a stick welder as a kid growing up on the farm and I thought that was easy to use...but not nearly as easy as my wire feed welder.
    I knew you were a smart guy, but this just reconfirms it

    I have a stick welder, I've not used it since I got the MIG, I think I should sell the darn thing.....

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
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    allen, i`ve got the hobart 135.....next size down from stu and steve`s....about 70# with a full roll of wire and runs off 110v...if your hinges and jamb are ferrous then just welding one screw hole would suffice for security....tod
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  10. #10
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    My first welder (25 years ago) was a Miller 225amp stick welder. Unlike a lot of them that have switched current levels, this one used a variable transformer that was controlled by a crank - It's still in use and is as solid as the day it was bought .... can't weld sheet metal with it.

    My second welder was (is) a Canox "Sparkler", also made by Miller. It's a wire feed, gas shielded 100 amp with a "push the wire" system (the most common). I've had it 15 years and it was 10+ years old when I bought it. It's still going strong and you CAN weld sheet metal with it. The specs say it's good for 3/16" penetration, but the duty cycle gets pretty short (10%).

    In between (being a tool repair guy in my working life), I've tried the flux-core, wire feed welders and yes ..... they work ...... but there's a lot of spatter and the welds are nowhere near as solid as a gas shield system. I find that when you grind back a flux core weld, the weld is full of pinholes. But, if that's what the budget will bear and you use them for hobby type stuff they're fine, but for a few bucks extra, your welds can be really solid and pretty to boot.

    just my $0.02 CDN ($0.017US)

    cheers eh?

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