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Thread: Chuckitis

  1. #1
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    Chuckitis

    When using a Oneway Talon chuck if the allen screws are tightened down against the lathe arbor I know its ok to sand in reverse but is it ok to turn in reverse? I have a lathe with both over the bed capabilities as well as outside the head capabilities & would like to be able to turn in reverse on the outside the head so I can hold & present the tools in the same manner I am accustom to.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  2. #2
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    What do you mean by "lathe arbor"? Do you mean the spindle?
    All my chucks are screw on only, no tightening screws. And, I'm not sure I would want to screw down on my spindle threads.
    In my limited experience, with my lathe, turning in reverse is not recommended.
    Also, depending on your lathe, just starting in reverse could be risky. If your lathe has a soft start I don't see a problem. But without soft start, you could spin your tool right off the spindle if started at a fairly high speed.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  3. #3
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    Sure, you can cut in reverse. Just no hogging. Light cuts work fine.
    Last edited by Carol Reed; 04-14-2010 at 02:45 PM.

  4. #4
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    I'm not saying it is safe or anything, but J. Paul Fennel, turns the inside of all his hollow forms backwards. I've seen him demo twice, the first time he did not have a chuck with any kind of set screw. The second time he did tighten down a set screw in a Oneway chuck. Do the set screws hit the threads, or the spindle behind the threads when tightened?

    If your on the outboard side, and your outboard spindle is RH thread, and your motor is running reverse, you just stand on the other side of the lathe and everything is the same. (I think)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    What do you mean by "lathe arbor"? Do you mean the spindle?
    All my chucks are screw on only, no tightening screws. And, I'm not sure I would want to screw down on my spindle threads.
    In my limited experience, with my lathe, turning in reverse is not recommended.
    Also, depending on your lathe, just starting in reverse could be risky. If your lathe has a soft start I don't see a problem. But without soft start, you could spin your tool right off the spindle if started at a fairly high speed.
    I've never used reverse yet but just wanted to say, my nova chuck's set screw does not screw down on the threads. It screws down behing the threads, there is a flat space there.

  6. #6
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    Bart,

    Paul is right about the set screw location on the spindle.

    On some lathes, the spindles are cut down behind the threads. I have no problem turning in reverse with the set screw tightened at the groove behind the threaded portion.
    But some lathes aren't. As seen in these two adapters:


    The one on the left was designed for reverse turning capability.
    The one on the right was not. Even the set screw is set against the flat portion of the thread, I don't have as much confidence as the other.

    Don't forget to loosen the set screw before removing the chuck.
    Gordon

  7. #7
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    OK, tightened against a flat would be more secure. My Grizz doesn't have a flat. I still would not want to tighten a set screw against the threads on my lathe.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  8. #8
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    A small piece of leather or plastic dropped into the set screw hole would do the trick of padding the screw against the threads. Nova chucks come with a "fiber disk" for this purpose. Of course we loose those about the time we take the chuck out of the box. I have recently heard that there are mylon set screws for this purpose too. Might have to check those out.
    Working flat so I can play round,
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  9. #9
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    Sorry to pick this thread up late but I regularly turn in reverse when hollowing for easier viewing and access, sometimes with quite agressive cuts.

    My lathe spindle has an undercut at the rear of the thread as shown in Gordons pic.

    My chuck did not have a locking screw but I drilled and Tapped the rear chuck flange 5mm and fitted a socket (hex) headed screw.

    Despite there only being the slightest dimple score now formed in the recess where the screw bites it is impossible to release the chuck even with a tommy bar when the locking screw is tightened.
    Chas. just a traveller on the road of time.

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chas Jones View Post
    Sorry to pick this thread up late but I regularly turn in reverse when hollowing for easier viewing and access, sometimes with quite agressive cuts.

    My lathe spindle has an undercut at the rear of the thread as shown in Gordons pic.

    My chuck did not have a locking screw but I drilled and Tapped the rear chuck flange 5mm and fitted a socket (hex) headed screw.

    Despite there only being the slightest dimple score now formed in the recess where the screw bites it is impossible to release the chuck even with a tommy bar when the locking screw is tightened.
    Thanks Chas for the supporting info & we'll forgive you for chiming in late,we all know what a long swim it is from there. Must make you feel like a small frog in a big pond.

    I know my arms were tired from that last note I sent you.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

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