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Thread: Panel raising bits

  1. #1
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    Panel raising bits

    I have been using my table saw to make raised panels for as long as I can remember but now I would like to try making them with a router bit to get more variation in their shape.
    My question is: do you prefer horizontal or vertical bits?
    By just looking at them the horizontal bits look safer to use but I don't use my router table enough to really know.
    Your thoughts, as usual, are appreciated.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  2. #2
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    The largest router I have is a PC 1.75 hp. if that helps anyone
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  3. #3
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    Interesting question.

    I lean towards the vertical being safer as there isn't near as much to go out of balance. But then the panel is a little tricker to handle...

  4. #4
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    well bob, i use horizontal type. and have made quite a few doors with them.. the key is keeping them down to the cutter.. use a stop on top to keep them from raising up and take more than one cut i have a 3hp router and dont know if a 1.75 will do it.. you need to slow them down when running the larger wings .. carol used a vertical and had her router set up to run horizontal with a metal plate. the smaller vetical bits would use less hp to run effectively.. but drop here aline and she can give you here thoughts beter than i.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  5. #5
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    Bob this thread http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...ll+tree&page=3 post 27 is how I run mine.
    I only use that set up on big panels that are to big to muscle around on the shaper.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  6. #6
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    OK. Wasn't going to, but Larry drug me in....

    First, my inclination is to always run the work on its widest edge. In the case of a panel that would be on its face. I use the "vertical" bit with the router hanging on a plate presenting the bit parallel to the table. Run the bit under the panel, like a jointer,

    A horizontal bit must be run with a variable speed router at its slowest speed. Slinging a half pound of steel in excess of 20,000 RPM is a recipe for disaster! At best, the wood will burn. At worst, yell "Incoming!" Then duck real quick.

    If you use the horizontal bit, set the bit to its final height and advance the fence deeper into the cut until the full cut is achieved. The bearing on the bit will determine the final pass.

    With the vertical bit, advance the router deeper into the cut until the full cut is achieved.

    With either bit, plan for the final pass to take off about 1/64th of an inch of material. That will eliminate any burning you may have incurred.

    That all said, raising panels is a shaper operation. The RPM's are significantly slower, even slower than the slowest router speed. Much wood is removed. With a router this is a tedious operation, as multiple passes must be made to be successful.

    Hint for any routed edge: chamfer the edge with a block plan to reduce the opportunity for split outs, blow outs, chip outs, and other bad word inducing mishaps.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Reed View Post
    OK. Wasn't going to, but Larry drug me in....
    i asked him to contact you in private carol not public.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  8. #8
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    Carol I have to correct you
    Slinging a half pound of steel in excess of 20,000 RPM is a recipe for disaster! At best, the wood will burn. At worst, yell "Incoming!" Then duck real quick.
    First my bit is 3/4 of a pound not a half
    Second my 1.5 hp PC router spins at 23,000 rpm not 20,000.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the ideas. Carol I don't know why you were not going to add your 2 cents worth, you are a wealth of knowledge and I take your posts like gospel (pardon the pun )

    I think I'll try a vertical bit. I'll make a taller fence to help keeping things steady, and use a feather board. Hopefully by taking small bites my router will have enough power. If not it's back to the TS,
    I'm making a hope chest for my daughter and it has 8 raised cherry panels. She wanted a more decorated design to the panels.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  10. #10
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    Bob,
    Since your gonna make a new fence Might I suggest you incororate something like this. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Router fence.jpg 
Views:	29 
Size:	29.2 KB 
ID:	44904 The shims are 1/8" pices of masonite. Since my fence is on the table saw, clamps to the TS fence. I set the final depth with the shims out then I add the shims. After each pass I can take out one row of shims at a time and sneak up on my final depth without changing my setup. Works real slick.
    Last edited by Don Baer; 04-22-2010 at 01:30 AM.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
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