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Thread: Build of a Krenov Style plane (Ron Hock Kit)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Reno NV
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    Build of a Krenov Style plane (Ron Hock Kit)

    So, made a little progress on the plane out in the shop today.

    I can say that this is absolutely dead easy so far.

    The parts of the kit are all pre-cut. What could be simpler? I did take Toni's advice and went to the college of the redwoods and downloaded their instructions. A little more detail than comes with the plane.

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    So next step is to position things and clamp it together. The instructions say to position the plane blade so the gap is about 3/16 and that the blade hits about 1/16 up on the inside. This will allow you to fine tune the throat later.

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    Hi, My names Brent and I'm a glue-aholic. I always seem to slop on glue. Oh well, I'll just deal with the squeeze out the way I always do and let it dry and chisel it off later.

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    While the body was drying, I decided to sharpen the blade. Now here's my big problem. I've got a real mishmash of sharpening stuff, and no real 'system' or rhyme or reason for the stones. I have a little woodcraft tri-stone I thought I would try and use. After reading part of Ron Hocks Sharpening book, I decided that I should check the stones for flatness first.

    Nope. They aren't flat, so I spent about 1 1/2 hours trying to flatten the stones on my DMT diamond stone, and plate glass and sandpaper. Never really did get it flat enough to my satisfaction. The plate glass and sandpaper works pretty good. I may just build my sharpening system around the Scary sharp method, unless I find a good deal on some kind of nice sized water stone system.

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    And that's about as far as I got today. Just sanded the excess glue off, and trimmed the excess wood of the ends. The positioning dowel's at the end will get trimmed off once I get the plane tuned up and working properly. At that time I'll go about doing the artsy carving to give it a little more personality than a shoebox with a blade...

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    Last edited by Brent Dowell; 04-26-2010 at 12:33 AM.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  2. #2
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    Jun 2008
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    GTA Ontario Canada
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    Well Brent i see you got off lightly with that kit. A guy with your skill could have made one easily.

    Still it came out nice and great fun Eh!. Now you got the real decision to make, how do you decide to shape it.

    i did not take too much time to think when i did mine and it came out ok.

    As to the stones in your picture i see you got some of that "router pad material under you paper.

    As far as i know that paper should be applied as either PSA type or use pray adhesive and place the paper onto the glass you have so its real flat.

    With that spongy stuff under it i dont see how the paper has sufficient support to do its job and remain flat.

    I dont have glass but have mine on a piece of MDF shelving off cut that was coated ex Borg.
    cheers

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    As to the stones in your picture i see you got some of that "router pad material under you paper.

    As far as i know that paper should be applied as either PSA type or use pray adhesive and place the paper onto the glass you have so its real flat.
    Heh, the sandpaper is attached to the glass. The glass is just setting on the padding...
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
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    Oh the humanity!!! How many horses must die to satisfy your gluing habits??? Actually, I'm sure you have no love loss with all the horses that come in your yard.

    Plane is coming along nicely!
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  5. #5
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    Reno NV
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    Very interesting. I've been looking at some pictures of actual planes made by James Krenov to get some inspiration for the next step.

    It appears that he puts a lot of thought into the comfort and usability without going 'all out' for the finish on them. As if they are meant to be used and not set up on a shelf as an art project...



    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
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    Brent,
    Another good source for building hand tools is Derek Cohen. He's a member here from perth Australia. Here's a link to his web site.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Catalunya
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    Hi Brent.

    So far so good, now just make some shavings BEFORE shaping it to your liking.

    A quick and rewarding project that can be repeated n times, now you know how to do it. If you mess with this one you can use the blade for another one, so no problem at all.
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  8. #8
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    Aug 2007
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    Reno NV
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    So, Did a little sole flattening tonight. I picked up a couple of natural granite tiles at Lowes. Glued a piece of 100 grit to it and went to town.

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    Opened up the throat a bit and tried to make some shavings. The plane feels like it wants to do it, but I'm having some issues with the throat width and the wedge. Seems like as I use the plane, shavings are hitting the wedge and plugging up the throat? Do I need to open up the throat even more? Just don't want to go too far on this. I did trim about a 1/8 off the wedge, as it was way down in the throat. Do I need to shorten this even more? A little reshaping?

    Thanks for any help you guys can provide!

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    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  9. #9
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    From the picture, it looks to me that the the wedge is too long and it is preventing the shavings to be pushed up. Try shortening it a bit and rounding the top part, making it like a rounded ramp so that the shavings do not get stuck on it. See sketch. Besides it looks to me that the shavings are too thick, but I can't be sure of that.
    Also check first that the bolt that holds the chipbreaker is not portruding on the other side of the blade lifting the wedge and separating it from the blade leaving a space for the shavings to get clogged underneath. If so just file the bolt or make a ligh slot on the wedge to acomodate it.

    I also polish the top part of the chipbreaker close to the blade edge to offer less resistance to the shavings, can be overkill for some people but I believe it does make a difference. The edge of the chipbreaker should not be more than 0.05 inches ( 1.5mm) from the cutting edge. You can also check that there is no gap between the edge of the chipbreaker and the blade, chipbreakers need fettling as well.
    Another thing to have into account is that when flattening the sole is that the blade should be on the body, and tightened without letting the edge portrude in order not to damage it. That tension can curve the body slightly making the plane not to perform well if the sole is flattened without it as it will deform once the blade is on it.
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    Last edited by Toni Ciuraneta; 04-27-2010 at 05:48 AM.
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
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    Making some shavings now!

    Well, I put the blade in and flattened the sole a little more.

    I trimmed up the wedge a bit more to give a bit more room. Gave the end of it a bit of a rounding over so that it didn't interfere with the shavings.

    I also made sure the cap iron was just a about 1/16 away from the blade edge. The blade and cap Iron from Hock tools is very nice and does fit pretty well. I probably just didn't have it adjusted quite right.

    Adjusted the blade so it was just barely peeking out, and voila! Shavings!

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    Last edited by Brent Dowell; 04-27-2010 at 08:44 PM.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


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