Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Are There Tables to Invert Circular Saws into Table Saws?

  1. #1

    Are There Tables to Invert Circular Saws into Table Saws?

    This doesn't sound safe to me, but I've heard tell of plans for a table that helps convert a circular saw into a table saw...

    I've been digging into this in response to this question:
    Does anyone make a table to mount and hold a circular saw inverted so it could be used as a temporary table saw?
    I'm dubious, but wanted to get your collective opinion.

    Also, would that be called a jig or a table?
    I'm the editor of ToolCrib.com.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    7,985
    Not that I know of. I doubt that any manufacturer would want the liability. Your right unsafe in my opinion.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Placitas, NM in the foothills of the Sandia Mt
    Posts
    688
    To borrow a phrase from Ralph Nader, UNSAFE AT ANY SPEED

    If you need to make straight cuts and don't have a table saw, try the 'guided circular saw" technique. Simplest thing to do is to start with a board a little longer than the stock you will be cutting. Main thing is that one side of that board needs to be good and straight. A 1x4 is fine, nothing too tall as part of the saw will ride over it.

    Glue a piece of hardboard, mdf, ply -whatever to that board so that it sticks out 4 or 5 inches. When its dry, run your saw over it, keeping the edge of the saw against the straight board. This is will cut a straight line thru the bottom board. That new edge on the bottom board is now your guide. Just line it up over the line you draw for the cut on your stock. Clamp it down and cut away. Should be nice, clean and straight.

    Here's a pic of one I made a few years ago out of two pieces of scrap.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails P1000028 (450 x 600).jpg  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    37° 5'16.25"N 76°25'28.11"W
    Posts
    193
    Popular Mechanics had a plan some time back for a setup like you describe. It was based on a table with drop in inserts for a circular saw, jig saw and router with provisions for a fence system and DC IIRC. It was probably 10 years or more ago, might check their website or the library for old copies on microfilm.

    I can't see it being very accurate, but I don't see anything inherently dangerous with it as long as everything is held tight. After all a table saw is nothing more than a motor with a blade suspended under a table.. With the self retracting blade guard it might be kinda neat.

    Mike

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Placitas, NM in the foothills of the Sandia Mt
    Posts
    688
    Quote Originally Posted by M Toupin View Post
    I can't see it being very accurate, but I don't see anything inherently dangerous with it as long as everything is held tight. After all a table saw is nothing more than a motor with a blade suspended under a table.. With the self retracting blade guard it might be kinda neat.

    Mike
    I would be concerned that there is presumably no height adjustment and no splitter. How would you keep it turned on - tape the trigger shut?? The retractable blade guard seems to me like kickback waiting to happen.

    My two cents...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nova Scotia's beautiful south shore
    Posts
    443
    These things were all over the place in the 50's. Skimpy little sheet metal or aluminum tables. They were a compromise at best.

    An old carpenter friend of mine told me that when the first circular saws came out they were often fitted under a wooden table table and used as cut-off saws. They used a foot pedal to lift the saw.

    He offered me his original saw from the 30's (iirc) sucker must have weighed 20 lbs !! Kinda wish I'd taken it, but you have to draw the line somewhere.
    All the best,
    Ian G

    **Now holding auditions for a catchy new signature**

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    37° 5'16.25"N 76°25'28.11"W
    Posts
    193
    Circular saws have a depth setting, it's just upside down on this setup. PITA yes, but functional. With a little bit of ingenuity a splitter could be added just like the home brew splitters added to 100s of table saws. We're talking a 7 1/4" circular saw here, I don't think kick back is going to be a catastrophic event like a 5hp TS. You're more than likely to stall the saw out before you get a kickback. I think we can agree there are better tools available, but in a situation were portability is a factor it would get the job done. I admire the farm brand ingenuity myself.

    Mike

    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse Cloud View Post
    I would be concerned that there is presumably no height adjustment and no splitter. How would you keep it turned on - tape the trigger shut?? The retractable blade guard seems to me like kickback waiting to happen.

    My two cents...

  8. #8
    Interesting approach M Toupin - I think that could work for someone with the wherewithal to do it well...

    My reply to our questioner will lean towards NOT home brew rigging something like this up, but that if they absolutely insist that they should add a splitter.

    I didn't get a good read from their question, but I *think* they were just asking as a way to avoid the cost of buying a table saw rather than for increased portability.

    Still, you never really know what to recommend for sure until you know the job I guess...

    Thank you guys - this was really helpful.

    G
    I'm the editor of ToolCrib.com.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Plainfield, IL
    Posts
    41
    If I remember correctly, my father had such a device back in the 70's. It was made by Hirsch. It looked like a workmate with a rectangular hole to mount the saw. It even had a slot plowed down either side for the miter gauge.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    7,985
    Garret,
    I think a little more info from the poster might help. If he wants to cut streight line then a saw guide like jesse suggested is a great way to go. If he doesn't want to make one then he can purchase on for less then $20 from either home Depot or Lowes. They both carry em. I boght one over 30 years ago and just finaly got rid of it because it got damaged when I moved. I bought another one to replace it. It's great for breaking down sheet good and much safer then a table saw for this operation.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •