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Thread: how to handle rough wood????

  1. #1
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    how to handle rough wood????

    In another thread I mentioned my planer blades got badly damaged from rough wood. I don't remember my most recent use of the planer but I do have a pretty good supply of both maple and walnut slabs I have to plane down for projects. Both of these were originally stored outdoors. I'm suspecting they got dirt and grit on them and that may be what damaged my blades. Which brings up the problem. How should wood like this be handled to prevent planer damage? After all a planers job is to smoothen rough wood. Yes, yes, I know, don't store outdoors in the first place. This wood was given to me, free. Up to now.
    Wat to do???
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  2. #2
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    I take a wire brush to it. Then shop vac off. If I do a bunch, I just brush off with a broom after the wire. If I suspect metal, I take the Little Wizard to it.

  3. #3
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    if they were stored on the ground, I'd go over them real good with a stiff brush to make sure you clean the outside off as good as possible.

    Those looked like some nasty nicks. Do you think there was any embedded metal in the boards?
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  4. #4
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    I stuff em in the big planer gravel and all
    Then run them through the little one to clean em up
    Did I mention the knifes in the big one are junk.
    I think the best thing to do Frank is box that stuff up and send it to me
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  5. #5
    I have planed a ton of rough wood and suffered no damage to the blades.

    Damage comes from (non wood) particles ranging from nails to bullets and sand and grit. Make sure all these are removed and there should be no problem. Brush down dirty woods, You can easily hose off dirty wood w/o changing the MC. Properly dried wood will shed water and only absorb water on the outer cells. To change the MC of the wood you have to expose to moisture over a long period. Hosing and allowing to drip dry will only slightly react If you hose all surfaces and stand on end to allow to dry (but not in direct sun) I reciently did some old Barn wood. Been nastied by groundhogs and cow... (we don't want to go there) Although it created quite a smell, I found no "Damage" to the blades. Wood is wood, rather it is rough or pre processed... Should not effect the blades.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Southwood View Post
    I take a wire brush to it. Then shop vac off. If I do a bunch, I just brush off with a broom after the wire. If I suspect metal, I take the Little Wizard to it.
    Yep, that is what I do too!

    Plus, I joint my rough wood first, the knives on my jointer are very substantial and will handle a lot of sharpenings, the knives on my planer are also the sharpen-able type, but they have a lot fewer trips to the sharpener in them.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
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    Yep. I larnt a thang or three.
    Will wire brush and hose or broom sweep off from now on. It's just a problem I never encountered before or even considered.
    Who was it that said, "there ain't no such thing as 'free' wood" ?
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  8. #8
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    Actually wood is not "just wood" in the sense that all woods machine easily.

    There are some areas of the country where there is so much silica in the water that the wood draws it up and it forms silica deposits in the wood. That stuff will dull tooling real quick. (some areas of Georgia are like this)

    A friend of mine was born in the Belgium Congo and told me about a tree so hard that it would quickly dull carbide chain saw chains. This tree was over 10' in diameter and they had a heck of a time getting it removed from an airstrip they were building. He tried burning some chips of this tree and said that after they had been in a bonfire all night they charred about 1 mm deep.
    They eventually sawed it into sections and bulldozed it to the edge of the airstrip. He knew the names of a lot of the exotic species of trees that we might recognize, but couldn't tell me what the tree was called other than what the native people called it. Of course I didn't have a clue what it was and can't remember.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Downes View Post
    Actually wood is not "just wood" in the sense that all woods machine easily.

    There are some areas of the country where there is so much silica in the water that the wood draws it up and it forms silica deposits in the wood. That stuff will dull tooling real quick. (some areas of Georgia are like this)

    A friend of mine was born in the Belgium Congo and told me about a tree so hard that it would quickly dull carbide chain saw chains. This tree was over 10' in diameter and they had a heck of a time getting it removed from an airstrip they were building. He tried burning some chips of this tree and said that after they had been in a bonfire all night they charred about 1 mm deep.
    They eventually sawed it into sections and bulldozed it to the edge of the airstrip. He knew the names of a lot of the exotic species of trees that we might recognize, but couldn't tell me what the tree was called other than what the native people called it. Of course I didn't have a clue what it was and can't remember.

    I used to correspond frequently with Jim King (a member but infrequent visitor here) who exports exotic woods from Peru. He has a wood, Queen something, he says makes Lignum Vitae look soft by comparison.
    He also mentioned one which is illegal to export that is extremely hard and "grows like grass". Those tourist carvings which are of figures and very heavy are made with some kinda incredible hard wood. I'd like to get ahold of some.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Southwood View Post
    I take a wire brush to it. Then shop vac off. If I do a bunch, I just brush off with a broom after the wire. If I suspect metal, I take the Little Wizard to it.
    I do just what Steve does.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

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