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Thread: Shoji

  1. #1

    Shoji

    Wanted to try building a shoji screen. Purchased a book with good overall advice. One area I am needing some help with is how to best/safely cut the 1/4" X 3/8" X approx 50" kumiko. They are the pieces that create the lattice pattern in te middle of the shoji.

    Originally planned to rip a 1/4" strip from 4/4 lumber. Then use a jig for cutting tapers tohold and rip two 3/8" pieces; but the length is too long for the jig.

    Another idea is work with thicker stock. Perhaps 8/4 will be safer to work with?

    Appreciate any ideas.

    tks
    Sal
    Sal Cangialosi

  2. #2
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    I'd rip em on the band saw.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
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  3. #3
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    Why not either resaw or plane the material to 3/8" then rip to 1/4"?

  4. #4
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    I use one of the Grrrippers push blocks, and with it, a 1/4" or 3/8" rip cut is very easy (and safe, IMHO) on the tablesaw. I've cut many, many feet of 1/4" x 3/4" strips with mine.
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  5. #5
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    Do you have the cut side on the fence side Vaughn? I've seen many jigs that sit in the slot on the left side of the blade that let you dial in a specific width of cut. You do have to move the fence for each cut, but the skinny strip is free to fall off to the left and doesn't get trapped between the fence and the blade.

    Of course, something like the gripper would make it safter no matter which way you did it...
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  6. #6
    Thanks for the quick replies and help. Some specific points are

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    I'd rip em on the band saw.
    Not sure of the accuracy using a band saw. But I can keep this as an option.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Lyon View Post
    Why not either resaw or plane the material to 3/8" then rip to 1/4"?
    That is a possibility and will make the job simpler. However, I was hoping to get two 3/8 pieces from each 1/4 rip of 4/4 lumber. Cutting the first 1/4 rip needs to be followed by the 3/8 rips from the off cut. This is where I am having a problem securing the thin piece for the second cut.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    I use one of the Grrrippers push blocks, and with it, a 1/4" or 3/8" rip cut is very easy (and safe, IMHO) on the tablesaw. I've cut many, many feet of 1/4" x 3/4" strips with mine.
    Look slike two grippers may be a solution. I will look into this further. Is is reasonable to use it to cut a lenght of approx 50"??
    Sal Cangialosi

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    Do you have the cut side on the fence side Vaughn?...
    If I'm cutting thinner than 1/4", I use the 'waste' side of the board and move my fence incrementally. (I have an Incra fence, so It's pretty easy to do.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Cangialosi View Post
    ...Look slike two grippers may be a solution. I will look into this further. Is is reasonable to use it to cut a lenght of approx 50"??
    You could do it with just one Grripper. The first 35" or 40" or so would be hand-fed into the saw (with your fingers well clear of the danger zone, then the last 10" to 15" would be guided by the Grripper. Or at least that's how I've done thin strips from long boards.

    Looking forward to seeing the project, Sal.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
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    I'm with Vaughn on the Grr-Rippers. I picked up the 1/8" outside plate option at the last WWing show I went to. It has come in so handy I just leave it on one of my pair. I also agree with resawing and then planing thicker stock to 3/8" and ripping 1/4" strips from it. Not sure on your design but if you chalk mark the 3/8" thick boards before ripping, you can reassemble the grain pattern on install to enhance the screen's look.
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