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Thread: expensive conclusion

  1. #1
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    expensive conclusion

    About a year ago I bought a 1" Henry Taylor HSS skew to replace the El Cheapo and yard sale specials I had been using.
    For a while I wasn't sure this was a step up. I do know the Taylor was about $50.00 and the other two were $5.00 each.
    However, after enough use to be sure, I have come to the conclusion the only step up was cost.
    I'm sure the no-name El Cheapo (bought on-line) lasted longer between sharpenings. Same with the Buck brand 'cast steel' garage sale special.
    I sold the El Cheapo for $10.00 so that is some consolation.
    I still have the Buck and may go back to using that as my regular.
    Right now, I'm making some bottle stoppers from scrap walnut. One stopper requires two to three sharpenings for the Taylor. Methinks it should be more like two or three stoppers per sharpening.
    Color me unhappy.
    Last edited by Frank Fusco; 05-29-2010 at 07:34 PM.
    "Folks is funny critters."

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  2. #2
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    Sorry to hear of your troubles Frank.

    I'll buy the Henry Taylor skew from you for $10
    Every child deserves a family. Adopt. Foster. Get involved.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Stratton View Post
    Sorry to hear of your troubles Frank.

    I'll buy the Henry Taylor skew from you for $10
    I just did another stopper using the antique Buck cast steel skew. Sharpened at start, still just as sharp at end.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  4. #4
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    expensive conclusion

    I never used a skew untill a few months ago,then decided to take the plunge.so I decided to go with what I thought was the best.(Doug Thompsons) and once I figured out how to get it sharp,)made my own honing wheel) where I could shave the hairs off my arms.I'v been practicin on bout anything and it still has a sharp edge on it after many many shavings.

  5. #5
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    I've discovered only times I have to sharpen my skews are when I use the blasted things. On the upside, I can go months and months between honings.

    Frank, I've got some Henry Taylor tools that I've picked up during various sales (including a skew) but I got the Kryo versions. I've been happy with how they hold an edge, including the skew (which I have actually used quite a bit). Sorry to hear the one you got isn't holding an edge.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Ward View Post
    I never used a skew untill a few months ago,then decided to take the plunge.so I decided to go with what I thought was the best.(Doug Thompsons) and once I figured out how to get it sharp,)made my own honing wheel) where I could shave the hairs off my arms.I'v been practicin on bout anything and it still has a sharp edge on it after many many shavings.
    I use a Wolverine for sharpening my turning tools. It is very good, even is 'Frank' proof.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    I've discovered only times I have to sharpen my skews are when I use the blasted things. On the upside, I can go months and months between honings.

    Frank, I've got some Henry Taylor tools that I've picked up during various sales (including a skew) but I got the Kryo versions. I've been happy with how they hold an edge, including the skew (which I have actually used quite a bit). Sorry to hear the one you got isn't holding an edge.
    Mine is HSS. I'm now thinking all hard steel turning tools are about the same in terms of usefulness and edge holding.
    The Kryo is/should be much more better. The Cold Steel knife company uses the same technique and claim many wonders for their knives.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    Mine is HSS. I'm now thinking all hard steel turning tools are about the same in terms of usefulness and edge holding.
    The Kryo is/should be much more better. The Cold Steel knife company uses the same technique and claim many wonders for their knives.
    Yeah, I've become a believer in the cryo-treated tools. Thompson gouges are what got me started, and it's also become my preference for the knives I've made. A couple of years ago I made my dad a meat carving knife out of a cryo blank I got from Texas Knifemaker's Supply. He's a real knife connoisseur, with racks of Wusthof, Henckels, and the like, and he spends more time honing kitchen knives than some folks spend using them. He's told me the cryo blade I used in his carving knife compares favorably to any of the knives he's got.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
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    I picked up a 10 pc Close-out from CS 8-10 years ago. They do a nice job. Since I learned on dull tools, I couldn't tell the difference . I learned to sharpen them and our local turning store does a great job too...only $3.50 a tool . After that..I found 2 words...Thomp-Son. Hard to beat and harder to dull
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  10. #10
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    I sent a copy of my original post to the Taylor company. Will be interesting to see what, if any, reply I get.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

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