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Thread: Burnishers

  1. #1
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    Burnishers

    Hi all

    I am about to make a handle for a Ron Hock burnishing rod. The rod comes with a small hole in one end which i suspect was used in the manufacturing process. So i have a few questions i need help with before i do this.

    1) Looking at how we use a burnisher to put a lip on a card scraper, i was wondering why there aint a handle both ends of the rod to be used. Any comments on this?

    2) Do you think Dogwood would be a good choice for this handle? I have a block that I picked up in a bargain bin at LV for $1.

    3) Given how short this rod is how would you recommend i secure it in the handle. A fair amount of force is exerted on the rod in use so i am concerned with the rod cracking out the side of the handle. Comments needed here.

    I have made very good chisel handles but they all had a fair around 1.5 to 2 inch tang which made securing the handle easy.

    The Hock burnisher is only a short rod and i dont particularly want to bury a large amount in the handle.

    Any ideas, comments suggestions or assistance would be most appreciated.

    I do have some ash on hand which i could turn as well but thought the dogwood was supposed to be the stuff of handles???

    Thanks in advance.
    cheers

  2. #2
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    Don't know for sure Rob but I would suspect that that small hole in one end is to pin the rod to the handle.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Thoits View Post
    Don't know for sure Rob but I would suspect that that small hole in one end is to pin the rod to the handle.
    Not sure about the wood choice but I'll bet Rons burnisher is a pretty good one.

    Other than drilling a hole the correct size and using a little epoxy to put it in, I don't think burnishers get much stress, especially from twisting or pulling or driving, so I think as long as you make something you like, and thats purty, you can't go wrong...
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Thoits View Post
    Don't know for sure Rob but I would suspect that that small hole in one end is to pin the rod to the handle.
    Chuck i am not sure about that cause i see the back end of the rod is black and unpolished. This rod has definitely been through dipping and to do that i think they popped this tiny little hole that looks to me like wire could be the only thing that will go through it.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    Not sure about the wood choice but I'll bet Rons burnisher is a pretty good one.

    Other than drilling a hole the correct size and using a little epoxy to put it in, I don't think burnishers get much stress, especially from twisting or pulling or driving, so I think as long as you make something you like, and thats purty, you can't go wrong...
    This is what i was about to do Brent then thought mmm put my South African Canadian pride in its pocket and ask the guys on the forum.

    I been looking at Stus file handle tutorial but this is different. If i dont want to loose a fair bit of the rod then i need a wood thats hard wont split when i press down on it so the cut through aint on.

    Will see what others have to say. Thanks for commenting.
    cheers

  5. #5
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    Here's what my store bought version looks like.

    Just a nice little handle with a ferrule.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #6

    burnishers

    Rob,
    The hole on the end is for heat treating. During the heat treating process the rod is hung on a wire so it hangs straight down. This helps prevent distortion while being heated and while being quenched. Dogwood makes excellent tool handles. I have a small stash of pink dogwood that I have used for several handles. it turns and finishes very nicely with a smooth grain and pinkish/peach color when oiled. I have found epoxy works very well for holding tangs in handles. I would suggest at least 1" and 1-1/2 if you can spare it. Also use a tight fitting ferrule to help prevent splitting. A press fit directly into the wood may be all you need and I would try that first. One trick is to grind a flat on the tang portion that will allow air to escape as you press the tool together. This is also important if you use a slight slip fit and epoxy. If you use epoxy, only put glue down one side of the hole and then push the rod in with the tang on the other side. when the rod is all pushed in, rotate it a complete turn to spread the glue around the rod. Epoxy can be messy. denatured alcohol is a solvent for uncured epoxy. All the best. Dave, Blue Spruce Toolworks.

  7. #7
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    thanks dave for dropping by and setting our resident canuck straight
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Hi all

    A fair amount of force is exerted on the rod in use so i am concerned with the rod cracking out the side of the handle. Comments needed here.
    Thanks in advance.
    Hi Rob.

    As far as I know there is no need of using that much force when creating the burr with the burnisher, this is a common mistaka made by many people.

    According to David Charlesworth just a few passes are needed if you have filed the edge properly.

    I use an old engine valve rod and works just as fine.
    Best regards,
    Toni

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  9. #9
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    Handles, African blackwood, smaller one is for a hock burnisher.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1930.JPG  

  10. #10
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    Those are some sweet looking handles there George....
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    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
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