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Thread: Mystery Plane from the Cobwebs

  1. #1
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    Mystery Plane from the Cobwebs

    Hi all:

    I was talking to my husband the other day about planes, and all of a sudden a light went on for him, "I've got a plane!"

    Here it is. Can anyone tell me a) what kind of plane it is, b) would it be any good, c) should I get it back in order, d) how to clean the rust off e) any idea of the age?

    Thanks so much,
    Cynthia
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cynthia White View Post
    Hi all:

    I was talking to my husband the other day about planes, and all of a sudden a light went on for him, "I've got a plane!"

    Here it is. Can anyone tell me a) what kind of plane it is,
    It's a Stanley says so right on it looks to be a #4
    b) would it be any good,
    Yes
    c) should I get it back in order, Yes
    d) how to clean the rust off Do a search here there is a few restoring plane threads
    e) any idea of the age? Not very old

    Thanks so much,
    Cynthia
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    answers in green
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  3. #3
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    What Chuck said...

    Sharpening and restoring planes is a vortex that can trap one very quickly...

    Look up something called 'Scary Sharp' that uses very fine grits of sandpaper and float glass. It's a good cheap way to get a plane sharp and back into working order...
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  4. #4
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    Looks like you have a relatively new (Post 1970) Stanley #4. The blue paint kinda gives the age away... While not as well thought of as some of its older brethren, the newer Stanleys can be sharpened and tuned to be quite decent users.

    Start by just cleaning off the rust and dirt, then sharpening the iron. A 30° or so bevel will be good, and when you reassemble the plane, make sure the blade's bevel goes DOWN. Adjust it for as fine a cut as you can get, and use the lateral adjuster to try for an even cut clear across the blade (sometimes hard to do, BTW).

    Once you get the first one working well, it becomes addicting. DAMHIKT...
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    Jim D.
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  5. #5
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    Hey thanks guys. For the record, I did see that it said Stanley on it I meant can you tell *which* one it is by the size and shape.....OK, I'll try to clean it up. The handle is loose. Can I tighten it? I can't really tell under the dirt if there's a screw there...
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  6. #6
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    Cynthia,

    Cynthia,
    Ya need to learn the proper terms ifn yr gonna start usn hand tools. Heresa web site top hep ya out.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Cynthia,
    Ya need to learn the proper terms ifn yr gonna start usn hand tools. Heresa web site top hep ya out.
    ya mean the thingermabobber that you put your hand on isn't a *handle*? You want me to say, "tote"? Gee I don't know Don if my brain is big enough to learn a lot of new words......Do I hafta?
    AKA Young Grasshopper Woodworker
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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Cynthia White View Post
    ya mean the thingermabobber that you put your hand on isn't a *handle*? You want me to say, "tote"? Gee I don't know Don if my brain is big enough to learn a lot of new words......Do I hafta?
    You "Hafta" if you want these Neanderthals to talk shop with ya...

    On the front of the shoe should be a number but, yes, the length is a give-a-way... Do some research on restoring before even approaching a new plane. There are volumes written on proper procedures to restore as well as proper planing techniques.

    Learn what a frog is and such, then remember to always lay the plane on its side to protect the blade. (or else racked in a manner to protect the blade)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    You "Hafta" if you want these Neanderthals to talk shop with ya...

    On the front of the shoe should be a number but, yes, the length is a give-a-way... Do some research on restoring before even approaching a new plane. There are volumes written on proper procedures to restore as well as proper planing techniques.

    Learn what a frog is and such, then remember to always lay the plane on its side to protect the blade. (or else racked in a manner to protect the blade)
    sounds like the ole school teaching coming threw again in her pic bill, it doesnt seem to have a no. and might be a 3 but more than likely a 4. and to her a frog is green right now
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    ...remember to always lay the plane on its side to protect the blade. (or else racked in a manner to protect the blade)
    Yeah, that way the blade (iron, actually, Cynthia) can slice your hand instead of the wooden bench top.

    Rant on: I wonder who the misguided shop teacher was who first insisted on laying a plane on its side to 'protect' the blade? The blade is made to cut wood, so laying it, blade down, on a wooden bench can't hurt it, and it actually protects it from damage, as well as protecting the user (or a passerby) from damage, too.

    Okay, rant off...
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

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