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Thread: L-O-N-G tool rest.....

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    L-O-N-G tool rest.....

    OK, I'm getting at this spindle work stuff, I have to admit, it is a whole different animal than most of the stuff I've been doing on the spinny side.

    The spindles will be about 26", by 2 1/4", I've had a really hard time with whip, with not getting a smooth cut.

    Here is the LONG tool rest I made up......

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    I've tired high speed, low speed, in between, and I've got SHARP tools, I mean SHARP!! but, still.............????

    I'll be working on it on Sunday, ALL DAY.....

    I made up a MDF power strop for the grinder......

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    This works REALLY well on the lathe tools

    Took ten minutes to make, cut it rough, made it round on the lathe, then put it on the grinder, trued it up again, a bit, added some rouge honning compound, and I'm in business

    The leather one I have works great too, but if I'm on the lathe working....makes it kind of hard to use, this is DEAD easy!

    I'm going to have to make a steady for this spindle work, I guess......

    Any tips and or tricks for this stuff?

    I'm doing the "Supported" by hand cuts, and cuts as light as I can make them...... more practice I guess........
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    Oct 2006
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    Not much I can off Stu as I have turned very little long spindles but I have seen what your dealing with. Sandpaper is your friend!

    I did see a steady rest once that should work for spindles. It consisted of two wheels against the back of the spindle, mounted on a simple L shaped bracket. Your turning tool makes the 3 contact point. The wheels were skate wheels.

    With the welder you could whip one out in just a few minutes.

    Look the the first photo on this page, It's similar to what I saw.

    If you want some old iron for you new lathe This is cool.

    Hope that helps some, but I bet you were all ready on this.

    Jeff
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Well, I think I can adapt my bowl steady to this spindle work, I just need to adjust it slightly.....

    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
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    Nov 2006
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    Mountain Home, Arkansas
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    I tried to make some spindles for display shelves for my wife' bell collection. Before starting, I remembered that my father, who was a professional furniture maker, always bought his spindles and slender posts. When I started turning them, I found out why. Even with a steady rest, things get real 'whippy' and turning can be impossible. Type of wood makes a huge difference. I was trying hickory and that is a fairly flexy wood. Comes a point where the time and effort exceed the value of the end result. Sorry, no help here, I'm just ruminating.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Oak Harbor Washington on Whidbey Island
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    Stu did you make the mount post on the right if you did how did you do it? If you did can you show pics.

    Also I like your pseudo plug in on the wall behind the lathe. What type of current do you get from it? I'll bet it real solid.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Kutztown PA
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    Hi Stu

    Long spindle work can really be frustrating sometimes. How are you with your skew for planing those long straight sections? If you are comfortable, now you can practice with one hand, while you steady the tool and the wood with the other! Once you get the wood round, you can use the fingers of your non tool holding hand to gently steady the spindle. If you burn your fingers you are pushing too hard.

    First, get all the detail work done on the ends. Put the tool rest up high, so the skew is cutting almost on top of the spindle. Get it into position and hold it with your dominant hand. With your other hand, place your thumb on top of the skew and wrap your fingers around behind the spindle. Now you are ready to cut. Light cuts are essential here. The harder you push with the tool, the harder you are going to have to push with your fingers, and that starts to hurt real fast. With a little bit of practice, you will be able to keep your fingers on the smooth parts of the wood and avoid the part that is being cut at any given instant. This goes a long way to reducing chatter and those ropy looking cuts, and does it a lot faster and easier than working around a steady rest. Good luck with it!

    Bill
    Bill Grumbine

    www.wonderfulwood.com

  7. #7
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    Oct 2006
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    Bart, OF COURSE I made it, what did you think, I BOUGHT it

    Bill, thanks, I'll give that a try, I have got the rope like cuts down pat
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Lyons Ohio
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    25
    Hi Stu,

    One other thing that has not been mentioned is to make sure you do not have too much pressure on the piece being turned. Maybe the tailstock is a little tight. It can cause flexing on the turning. Try backing off the the ram a little.

    Also, nice looking long rest you have there. When I was doing Shaker chairs, I made one out of hard maple that was about forty inches long. It worked pretty well for those long back posts on the no. 7 rockers.

    Best wishes,
    Dave

  9. #9
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    Oct 2006
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    Thanks David, I did try that too.

    Bill's advice to go almost on top seemed to work the best, and just more time at it, I was able to do an OK job, I think.......

    The ropy or wavy-ness was light enough that a few seconds with a #120 grit gouge and it as smooth sailing

    OK, some pics.............. Please understand, I'm just learning this, so the results are just beginners results, I'm sure the guys that have done a ton of these will see all kinds of errors!

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    Well, there you go, got one done!
    Sanded to #320

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    I did find that the leg looked too............. soft........

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    the transitions are too......... smooth???

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    I needed to add some accent points....

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    I think this is better, not perfect, but better....?

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    OK, on to trying to make one look similar to the first one....

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    Certainly not a "Exact" copy, but "Similar", especially if they are at opposite ends of the table.....

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    Yep, "Similar" might even be stretching is a bit, but I am learning.......

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    What do you think?

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    I think I need WAY more practice, so hear are the next victim, some pieces of "Hemlock! should be fun......
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Oh yeah, here are two pics of the "Bango" I made to hold the other end of the long rest.........

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    1/2" plate steel MIG welded to a thick piece of angle iron, then a 1" hole drilled in it, and another hole drilled in the edge of the plate and tapped for the locking bolt.

    Drill and tap the side hole before you weld the plate onto the angle iron.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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