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Thread: Tiger Maple

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Michigan
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    2,436

    Tiger Maple

    It's been a couple years since I have done anything woodworking related....got real busy fixing up the damages of a hailstorm that hit here.

    But.....I recently was up in the U.P. doing some building when a friend gave me a hunk (4" x 12" x 9') of Tiger Maple to use as a mantle in our (hopefully) new hunting/fishing cabin (or whatever it will be)

    So I brought it home and ran it through my planer to better see the grain.

    Question I have is, does anyone have any pics of anything they made using tiger maple and how they did the finish that they wouldn't mind sharing?

    Thanks
    A very wise man once said.......
    "I'll take my chances with Misseurs Smith and Wesson. "

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
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    13,447
    Steve,

    What a cool mantle that will be...can't wait to see pics.

    I'm no finish expert (by a long shot), but I've finished tiger maple two different ways so far. The first was a humidor for a friend using water based poly, no stains.

    http://picasaweb.google.com/libertys...glass/Humidor#


    The second was some gun grips using linseed oil and a wax finish.

    http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...2&postcount=10
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  3. #3
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    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    A coat of oil - linseed or tung - followed by a couple coats of SealCoat® shellac after the oil cures (at least a week), then several coats of your favorite (whatever it is) clear finish will really pop the tiger.

    I've done several smaller projects with it that way. I'll try to find some pix later (assuming I still have them).
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,832
    That could be one of the most valuable mantels enneywhere.
    Tiger stripe maple is very popular for gunstocks, especially on traditional muzzle loading long rifles.
    Finishing methods vary but prep work can be extensive involving scraping with broken glass, wetting, scraping some more and again and again, then sanding with very fine sandpaper. Stripes are enhanced with very dilute nitric acid then stopped with an alkaline solution. Sanded a few more times then a favorite old time 'seecret receit' finish forumula is applied. Very beautiful.
    If I were at my own 'puter I would show you a pic of my rifle.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    NH
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    No pics. no maple. no mantel.
    No slack for you Steve you know the rules.
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
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    While not tiger Maple, here are two close cousins (quilted and Birds eye) on a chair I built. Finish is BLO followed by poly.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1620.JPG  
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    Hot dawg! Good to see you drop in, Steve.

    Tiger maple is great with a bit of pretty much any oil finish to pop the grain. It also does well with dyes to highlight the figure. Much like the nitric acid idea Frank mentioned, you can dye it and sand back the color so the dye only remains in the more absorbent parts of the wood. You can do a single color, or layer several complimentary colors, starting with the darkest, and working backwards to the lightest, sanding between each color. Here's a little piece I did recently using black, red, and honey amber Transtint (in that order), sanding back each color as I went, but leaving most of the amber...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Oliver Springs, TN
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    Steve,
    I built this table a couple of years ago. It's ambrosia maple, curly maple, and purple heart. I followed the recipe that the wood whisperer has on his site. In a nut shell you use a dye in shellac let it dry and they sand with 220. I used honey amber transtint. You then top coat with an oil finish.

    Here's a link to the video on Mark's site.

    http://thewoodwhisperer.com/episode-...oes-the-maple/
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ambrosia.JPG   ambrosia table leg.JPG  

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Thoits View Post
    No pics. no maple. no mantel.
    No slack for you Steve you know the rules.
    So true, it is hard to drool over words alone, wet it down and take a picture

    Need some envy fodder...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Michigan
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    2,436
    Wow nice looking stuff fellas! Hope the grain looks as nice when I'm done as your projects do.

    Chuck and Bill, I'll snap some pics next time I am able to.

    Here's something else you guys can let me know what you think of.....I need to make two corbels. I am thinking of 3 options.

    1.) Since the hunk is 9 foot long, cut off 1 foot and use that for the corbels.

    2.) I have a hunk of Walnut (from Mr. Ambassadore) that would work and leave it a natural edge facing out. (remember this is going in a hunting/fishing cabin in da north) so a bit of rustic would be ok.

    3.) Obtain some cherry for corbels. Natural edge or smooth.....not sure of that yet on any of the corbel choices.

    One thing I am sure of....it is gonna be HEAVY! Pretty sure I am gonna need help fastening it to the wall....road trip anyone? Beer included.
    A very wise man once said.......
    "I'll take my chances with Misseurs Smith and Wesson. "

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