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Thread: Renaissance wax question

  1. #1
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    Renaissance wax question

    I have been using Renaissance wax on alot of the turnings and I read a article on AAW where someone stated the best way to use it is to put it on by hand scrubbing it in with a rag or paper towel............let it sit for a hr and then buff it off with a cotton wheel at low speed.......the person said that it would produce the best shine that way...........anybody else using it this way ?
    Low speed ?............like what?.......800 or lower ?
    I pm the person and never did get a answer but thought I would post on here and see how others are using it...................
    I have been using it on some of the projects that i finished with laquer............let dry for a week or better......knocked down with 0000 then applied it by hand and removed it by hand both............would there really be that big of a difference..............
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  2. #2
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    After a piece has been buffed with the other compounds, I apply a thin coat of Renaissance wax by hand (I use a little 2" or so square of t-shirt material), let that dry for a while (5 to 30 minutes, give or take), then buff with a clean flannel (cotton) wheel spinning between about 800 and 1200 rpm. I use a light touch and relatively low speed to avoid melting (and removing) the wax.
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  3. #3
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    I've never used the Ren wax, but see that lots of turners do... I guess I need to try it sometime. Until then only answer I have is
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
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  4. #4
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    I started using it because I didn't like finger prints or water spots on my pieces. I apply it by hand with a soft paper towel or T-shirt. I leave it for 2 to 5 minutes then buff. They say it dries instantly.
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  5. #5
    After buffing with appropriate compounds I apply ren/wax by hand real skin then buff it off with a light touch to the cotton wheel.
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  6. #6
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    Well thanks for the responses.......I have been doing it either by hand or on a buffer i have with a speed or 1250.....very light touch is right.......have also buffed by hand...........just depends i guess.....but thanks for the responses
    First you have to learn the rules - Beginner
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    Then you disregard the rules - This takes you to the master level................

  7. #7
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    I remember when Eli Avisera was here doing a Demo he said that anything you put on a piece on the lathe should be applied with the lathe turned off, his main reason for this was the the spinning piece would fling the finish out from the piece. I guess this would only apply to the outside of a bowl

    The other reason he said was safety, which in my opinion is even more important, spinning wood, finish and fingers combined could result in a trip to the hospital

    BTW, I've been told that the clear shoe polish, the Kiwi stuff, is basically the same as the Renaissance wax

    I know it sure smells the same, and it costs a TON less, and if it works for shoes FYI
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    BTW, I've been told that the clear shoe polish, the Kiwi stuff, is basically the same as the Renaissance wax
    I was going to say that the Ren Wax does have a distinctive odor. Never smelled the clear Kiwi wax, but I doubt it has the same insert describing all of the various benefits and applications!

    Just bought a can of the Ren wax a little while ago. Guess next time I stop by Wally World I'll have to take a look for some kiwi!
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    I remember when Eli Avisera was here doing a Demo he said that anything you put on a piece on the lathe should be applied with the lathe turned off, his main reason for this was the the spinning piece would fling the finish out from the piece. I guess this would only apply to the outside of a bowl

    The other reason he said was safety, which in my opinion is even more important, spinning wood, finish and fingers combined could result in a trip to the hospital ...
    I do nearly all my finishing off the lathe, but I'm guessing Eli doesn't use a lot of friction polish like Myland's. Although I wouldn'[t use it on a bowl of other large piece, it's handy stuff for smaller things that don't need a super durable finish.
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  10. #10
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    Years ago, I used to use both Ren wax and Mylands on pens...then I was schooled by finishes that wore off. On boxes they both work well. I adopted an approach that Richard Raffin did on a video. He wiped a piece of 0000 steel wool in renwax and applied it at about 800 rpm. It looks really cool!
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