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Thread: Edge joining on a table saw

  1. #1
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    Edge joining on a table saw

    A few weeks ago I did an evaluation of a thin kerf glue ready rip blade by Freud in this thread.
    Well that well and good if you are starting out with board that are straight to begin with but if you get a crocked one you have to go to the joiner and then what good is the blade. What I do and it works well is take a piece of 1 inch square alum tubing and place it on the bowed edge. I attach it with screws and then shim between the aluminum tubing and the wood.http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...1&d=1279066992, I have a good edge to reference from and can get quality glue line edges. I bought two 8 foot pieces cut one a 3 ft and this give me three different sizes. This is a real time saver and also if your working alone on some real long boards it is a lot easier. Also for folks just getting started using this method and making a planer sled for face joining. it can negate the need for even buying a joiner.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1623.JPG   IMG_1624.JPG   IMG_1625.JPG   IMG_1626.JPG   IMG_1627.JPG  

    Last edited by Don Baer; 07-14-2010 at 12:25 AM.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Also for folks just getting started using this method and making a planer sled for face joining. it can negate the need for even buying a joiner.
    Not to mention if your boards are too long for a jointer or too wide for a jointer, this and the planer sled makes a pretty good solution.

    Just make sure your blade is absolutely square to the table. For my table top, I think my blade might have been literally just a hair off 90. So now I have about a 1/8 curve to my table top.

    I'm working on yet another jig/solution to this problem and will hopefully be able to implement it this weekend...
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    Just make sure your blade is absolutely square to the table. For my table top, I think my blade might have been literally just a hair off 90. So now I have about a 1/8 curve to my table top.
    Brent, don't ya have one of these ?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1628.JPG  
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Brent, don't ya have one of these ?
    Where did you find an aluminum bevel triangle that's truly accurate? All the ones I've ever seen were close approximations, but not square. Something a carpenter would use, but not a cabinetmaker.

    This is what I use...


    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Brent, don't ya have one of these ?
    I have had a couple of those. Framing squares or construction squares and that's what they're good for. Mine have never been accurate enough for machine setup. A quality combination square or try square is the better choice for setting up your shop equipment.

    Cheers,
    Dan Gonzales
    Whittier, CA, USA
    Dona nobis pacem

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Where did you find an aluminum bevel triangle that's truly accurate? All the ones I've ever seen were close approximations, but not square. Something a carpenter would use, but not a cabinetmaker.

    This is what I use...


    well when I bought it I checked it out with this so i know it's "TRULY ACCURATE"
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1629.JPG  
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
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    I've got the plastic and the stainless steel machinist squares and plastic ones etc...

    I just forgot to check before I made the cuts!

    But what I really should have used was my wixey....

    As they say, lesson learned...
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    well when I bought it I checked it out with this so i know it's "TRULY ACCURATE"

    Don not trying to contrary but, i have a square just like that. Dad passed it down to me. I tested it and boy i thought no one could ever knock those out of square. Only my Dad could. Now its going to be wall decoration.

    I would check mine if i were you. Show us a couple of lines drawn from the same straight edge. i too would trust my wixey before the square.
    cheers

  9. #9
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    Rob, I'd show you a couple of lines but all you would see is one line, I check that little guys constantly since I use it a lot.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    Not to mention if your boards are too long for a jointer or too wide for a jointer, this and the planer sled makes a pretty good solution.

    Just make sure your blade is absolutely square to the table. For my table top, I think my blade might have been literally just a hair off 90. So now I have about a 1/8 curve to my table top.

    I'm working on yet another jig/solution to this problem and will hopefully be able to implement it this weekend...

    When I am gluing up boards like this I'll flip the second board in the joint. Say you line the boards up and mark them the way you want. For one board in the joint face the mark towards the jointer fence and for the other board in the joint face it away. Doing this cancels out any unsquareness. Say your jointer fence is set to 89 deg. and the first board is jointed at that, when the second board is jointed the other direction and turned around it makes 91 deg. and the slight unsquareness cancels each other out. May be hard to understand, let me know if you need a better explanation

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