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Thread: Repair and Refinishing Job - More on the History of the Wood

  1. #1
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    Oct 2006
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    Repair and Refinishing Job - More on the History of the Wood

    Bud is a friend of mine from an Internet travel forum. Ive known Bud (virtually) for over a decade, and weve become good buddies. Hes old enough to be my dad, and probably glad hes not. As a WWII Navy vet and retired California Highway Patrol officer with a car racing habit, he has a lifetime of stories that are a joy to read. (Here's a pic of Bud's patrol car and the result of a deer hunting trip a few years ago.) Bud's wife passed away a year or so ago, and he's at that stage of his life where he wants to make sure some of his things will be taken care of and appreciated when he's gone.

    A while back Bud contacted me and asked if I could help him with his redwood platter. He had a platter that hed purchased years ago and it needed refinishing. He knows of my lathe work, and figured I have the tools and materials to get the job done. His only stipulation was that he wanted me to keep the platter when I was done. He felt it was a special piece of wood, and he wanted to be sure it would be in the hands of someone who would truly appreciate it. I told him Id be honored to refinish the platter, and would be proud to add it to my personal collection of turned pieces. Well, somewhere between taking it down off the shelf and getting it boxed to ship, Bud accidentally dropped the platter, and a chunk was broken off the rim. Nonetheless, he taped the piece back in place and shipped it to me, apologizing for the accident.

    When I opened the package from Bud, I couldnt believe my eyes. Inside the box was a platter, 15″ in diameter, made out of the most stunning piece of redwood burl Id ever seen. The gloss finish was indeed in bad shape, and sure enough, there was a chunk broken out of the rim, but it looked fixable. Heres how it looked fresh out of the box:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    After a number of steps over the course of a month or more, here's what I ended up with. It's got a very high gloss and smooth lacquer finish over several coats of polymerized tung oil, but the gloss isn't very apparent in these pictures:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    You can see there's a sticker on the back of the piece. This is the label showing who made it, and it also covers the hole where the blank was mounted to the lathe with a screw chuck. Here's a closeup of the label, back in its original position, and also a glimpse at some of the absolutely gorgeous figure in this wood:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I did a long write-up with a lot more pics and put it on my blog. Click this link if you're interested in the rest of the story:

    http://workingwoods.com/blog/wordpre.../buds-platter/

    Even though I didn't turn it myself, this is still one of the nicest pieces of wood that's ever been on my lathe. And coming from Bud, it's one of the most cherished pieces in my collection.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  2. #2
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    very impressive.

  3. #3
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    Dec 2007
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    Los Angeles, CA
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    You have done him proud.

    Beautiful wood and platter. Great restoration work.

    Did you use epoxy to glue the broken piece back on?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Palm Springs, Ca
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    1,169
    Nice restoration................wish I had some of that to just turn............yep I would keep it to...........
    First you have to learn the rules - Beginner
    Then you have to learn advanced rules - Professional
    Then you disregard the rules - This takes you to the master level................

  5. #5
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    S E Washington State
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    Boy, what a beautiful piece of wood. Very nice job restoring it.

  6. #6
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    Goodland, Kansas
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    Beautiful piece of wood. Well done Vaughn.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    bethel springs TN, but was born and raised in north east PA
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    super nice platter and some assume wood. not to shabbie on that repair ether.
    Steve

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    Thanks guys. I posted this to show off the wood...the work I did was minor compared to what the tree did.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mohammad Madha View Post
    ...Did you use epoxy to glue the broken piece back on?
    Just Titebond II and a couple rubber bands. Luckily the break was clean and unsplintered. The glue joint has disappeared. I honestly can't find it anymore.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
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    17,474
    well done vaughn...purty wood
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Harvey, Michigan
    Posts
    687
    Wow! Great story and an absolutely stunning piece of wood! Really nice job on the restoration Vaughn! Definitely a turning you will want to display for a long time!
    Steve

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