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Thread: Is a "Dutchman" a "Dutchman" everywhere?

  1. #1
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    Is a "Dutchman" a "Dutchman" everywhere?

    What do you call the "patches" that are glued onto the outer layers of plywood (as in the centre of the following photo) ?

    Attachment 4386

    I was taught to call such a thing a "Dutchman". I assume this is becuase it is plugging a hole.
    Last edited by Frank Pellow; 02-06-2007 at 11:21 PM. Reason: spelling
    Cheers, Frank

  2. #2
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    I call 'em dutchmen when they're shaped like a bowtie ... i don't know why the football ones don't qualify in my head, though. I don't think the shape matters, but for some reason my brain says a football is a "patch" and a bowtie is a dutchman.
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA

  3. #3
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    That's what I always have called them too. I guess the name comes from the Dutch being so inventive when saving $$ and making do with what they have.
    I once heard that cats and women will do darn well what they please and that men and dogs would do well to accept it and just go on.

  4. #4
    Steve Clardy Guest
    If they speak DUTCH. I guess so

    Thats what I've always called them.

    As far as the FOOTBALL repairs in plywood, I can't name them here

  5. #5
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    You guys are too much....
    A dutchman is the term given to a piece that is tapered when cut on a table saw. Made by ripping a board straight, but with the blade leaning over at some degree other than 0, has a point or close to it on one side and is wider on the other. when finished can be used to fill a long narrow crack. Like a wedge but opposite. A dutchman is from Dutchland and they all have wooden feet,er Shoes.
    Now I may be wrong, what's your guess?
    Shaz
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  6. #6
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    Well I could call my folks Dutchmen, but they're Canadian citizens now.
    ...

    And I've never hear of those football patches being called such.

  7. #7
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    Did you ever listen to Dutch men talk? Very confusing. It sounds like they are talking my language but I just don't know what they are saying.
    Jim

  8. #8
    I have heard them called Dutchmen when they were other than the Bowtie shape. I just wonder what the Dutch call them.

    I know that "Going Dutch" is a derogatory term referring to being too cheap to treat so each pays their share... So that is a bit of insult to the Dutch. Perhaps It too is a derogatory term refering to being too cheap to get another piece of wood. Maybe an insult(?)

    Frugle is perhaps a better term.
    I have a lot of "Frugle" friends.

  9. #9
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    Speaking as a genuine PA Dutchman, no, they aren't all the same. Us Pennsylfanich Deitsch are Deutschmann - i.e. from that place die Englander call Germany. But when the English ear heard Deitsch (dialect of Deutsch), it processed it as Dutch. We are not to be confused with die Hollander!

    Around here most patches on wood are referred to as a dutchman, but that plywood stuff we call footballs. A dutchman is designed to cover up a defect or mistake in the wood instead of replacing the whole piece. I don't know that dovetailed bowties would qualify from an historical point of view, since they pretty much call attention to the defect rather than attempt to hide it.

    Bill
    Bill Grumbine

    www.wonderfulwood.com

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    Perhaps It too is a derogatory term refering to being too cheap to get another piece of wood. Maybe an insult(?)
    I suppose it is possible, but my understanding is that it was too much work to replace a piece, with time and materials both commanding a premium. A lot of older woodwork was painted anyway, so it wasn't a real issue. It would be more of an issue on a naturally finished piece, but I can't recall seeing a lot of dutchmen on naturally finished pieces. I could be wrong though. Hard to believe, but it does happen from time to time.

    Bill
    Bill Grumbine

    www.wonderfulwood.com

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