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Thread: Twist-Lock vs Normal Plugs and Outlets on 220V Tools

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Twist-Lock vs Normal Plugs and Outlets on 220V Tools

    I was wondering how people felt out using twist-lock (L6-20) plugs vs non twist-lock (6-20) plugs on their mostly-stationary power tools (table saw, bandsaw, jointer, etc)?

    The table saw I have came with a 6-20 plug on it, but I need to make it a bit longer so I am debating using twist-locks on a new cable, and the jointer and bandsaw don't have plugs yet. (I haven't figured that reasoning out yet since they're all from Grizzly.)

    The outlets I had installed were twist-lock because at the time I thought that would be a bit more secure, but then I started thinking that maybe that's not the best thing of somehow I managed to trip on one or drop a board on one.

    Anyway, I was just wondering what people were using and what they thought the pros / cons were? The non twist-lock parts are certainly cheaper, but not by so much that it matters at this point.

    Thanks,
    -Doug

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Constantine, MI
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    7,891
    I use twist lock, but all my 220's are drops from the ceiling. A normal plug would not have worked. I've not given it a lot of thought, but your point about tripping over a cord that is solidly connected to the wall gives one reason to speculate.
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  3. #3
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    I have the L1420 non twist lock.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
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    Tablesaw, Bandsaw, Dust Collector and Compressor all have twist locks. I won't use anything else.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  5. #5
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    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
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    Mine are not twist-lock which I doubt would help me if I tripped over the cord. They fit quite snug and my outlets are all four feet off the ground. I added my own cords and made them long enough for a comfortable service loop so, no guitar-string-tight runs to trip over. As long as the plug and socket meet the requirement, the format is your choice.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  6. #6
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    I don't remember what plug I have but it has a horizontal spade & a vertical spade with the ground between. No twist lock for me. If it can't come out of the plug-in the plug-in can be broken not to mention me falling flat on my face.

    When I replace the factory cord I install a 15' cord 2-12 with ground.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
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  7. #7
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    I use straight NEMA 6-15 plugs on my table saw, jointer, planer and the extension cord that goes to the house. I chose the straight plug option because they were cheaper than the locking ones. The one thing I like about most locking cord plugs and receptacles is the easier grip due to their size. For drop lines you can't beat the locking NEMA L6-15 or L6-20 fixtures.

    Another thing to consider is that portable generators usually only take the locking fixtures. That is why contractors usually carry locking extension cords and pigtails.
    Last edited by Dan Gonzales; 08-21-2010 at 01:03 AM.
    Dan Gonzales
    Whittier, CA, USA
    Dona nobis pacem

  8. #8
    You got a problem with them falling out? Overhead plugs, they are great. normal use plugs they are a pain in the tushie. Costs too much, difficult to lock in, just a royal pain..... But then, that is my opinion.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gonzales View Post
    I use straight NEMA 5-15 plugs on my table saw, jointer, planer and the extension cord that goes to the house. I believe chose the straight plug option because they were cheaper than the locking ones. The one thing I like about most locking cord plugs and receptacles is the easier grip due to their size. For drop lines you can't beat the locking NEMA L6-15 or L6-20 fixtures.

    Another thing to consider is that portable generators usually only take the locking fixtures. That is why contractors usually carry locking extension cords and pigtails.
    My portable generator, a Coleman Powermate uses the non twist type, That why I went with then in the shop, I have a double ended cord so I can back feed the power panel in the event of a loss of power through the shop.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    My portable generator, a Coleman Powermate uses the non twist type, That why I went with then in the shop, I have a double ended cord so I can back feed the power panel in the event of a loss of power through the shop.
    I said usually
    Dan Gonzales
    Whittier, CA, USA
    Dona nobis pacem

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