Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Calling all lacquer sniffers! (finish question)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Rochester
    Posts
    846

    Question Calling all lacquer sniffers! (finish question)

    Got a question for you folks who've used lacquer before or have a good rub out process. What's your method?
    Got Wood?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    Scott;
    Dave Hawksford posted a great thread in the finishing forum on just this subject. You can find it by following this link
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Villa Park, CA
    Posts
    1,407
    If your surface is flat, start with a sheet of 600 grit wet-or-dry on a sanding block and wet sand the surface to get all the orange peel and swarf bumps out. Then, get the white polishing compound (not the orange) from any auto parts store and use a small damp rag. Rub in circles and keep the surface damp. The more you rub, the more gloss.

    You can use a 1000 grit wet-or-dry prior to the polishing compound, if you want. It'll make the polishing faster.

    If you do a lot of rub out, get the Menzerna brand compounds - a coarse, medium fine and the very fine. Target Coatings carries the Menzerna brand. Good stuff.

    Mike

    P.S. You normally should put three coats of lacquer on before you rub out so that the finish is thick enough that you don't sand or polish through it.
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Rochester
    Posts
    846
    Excellent! Just the info I was looking for....thanks guys!

    There's probably 6-8 coats on there so thickness shouldn't be a problem. Any additional tips if the surface is curved?
    Last edited by scott spencer; 08-26-2010 at 11:38 PM. Reason: nuther question...
    Got Wood?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Villa Park, CA
    Posts
    1,407
    Quote Originally Posted by scott spencer View Post
    Excellent! Just the info I was looking for....thanks guys!

    There's probably 6-8 coats on there so thickness shouldn't be a problem. Any additional tips if the surface is curved?
    If the surface is curved and not too big, use the orange compound from the auto parts store. I think it's called rubbing compound and the white stuff is called polishing compound. Rub the same way as described above for the polishing compound.

    It's just a lot of work but it will do the job. The coarse Menzerna is probalby faster than the auto rubbing compound but the auto stuff is more available.

    In any case, follow with the white polishing compound to bring up the shine.

    To get the feel for the rubbing, I'd do a scrap piece first and see how it works for you.

    Mike
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,366
    The only think I would say is to not be too impatient... One of my major faults. Let it dry and dry and dry before you tackle the wet sanding and polishing...
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    I've used Mike's procedure on flatwork with great results. On round stuff I'll wet sand with 600 (without a block, or with a medium firm rubber pad) carefully, then go straight to the buffing wheels with tripoli followed by white diamond compound, or Don Pencil's PL compound all by itself. After either of these buffing approaches, then I follow with Renaissance wax.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
    Not my way. I use Pumice and Mineral Oil and a Felt Caulkboard Eraser. rub it down with pumice & oil, then when it is smoothe, start to bring the gloss with Rotten stone & Oil, again with a new Felt Eraser.

    No need for the sandpaper which removes too much finish or the wet sanding which IMHO is not good for Lacquer finishes or wood for that matter.

    This method works for me and has for more decades than I care to remember, The wet sanding may be a favorite of others but try the oil rub and see how quickly the finish is evened out and brought to the shine you prefer. You can control the gloss with your efforts.

    You can get Pumice and Rotten Stone at any good WWing store, Mineral Oil at the drug store. Erasers at any School supply store. (I keep them in a plastic Peanut Butter jar till my next need (be sure and mark which is Pumice & which is Rotten stone))

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,366
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    Mineral Oil at the drug store.
    In the laxative aisle...
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Rochester
    Posts
    846
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    In the laxative aisle...
    They already think I'm full of it....this oughta confirm their suspicions!

    Thanks gang!
    Got Wood?

Similar Threads

  1. Rubbing out a lacquer finish methods
    By larry merlau in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 08-21-2014, 02:09 AM
  2. home brew lacquer finish, good, bad, or ugly?
    By hu lowery in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-23-2013, 04:13 PM
  3. Lacquer question
    By Al killian in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-07-2009, 06:57 PM
  4. another log question??(calling Alex!)
    By larry merlau in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 05-30-2009, 02:32 AM
  5. what sealer/lacquer for BLO bowl finish
    By Nathan Hawkes in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-19-2008, 03:23 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •