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Thread: Spokeshave Hand-Me-Downs

  1. #1
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    Spokeshave Hand-Me-Downs

    Dad passed these along. Not sure of their history but I can guaranteed dad got them somewhere else. How do I know? They are abused. I haven't gotten to the No. 55 yet but did clean up the boxwood handle and put an edge on the blade for it. It made quick work of an end on a rectangular piece of QSWO scrap.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The running hammer is leftover from dad's jewelry making days and had a broken handle acquired during a move from somewhere to somewhere else. I restored the handle and will probably use it as a nic-nac as I have other purpose specific hammers for the shop.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  2. #2
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    I have one of those wood handled shaves, and it's far and away the best shave I've ever used. I've got a whole wall rack full of Stanleys, but that little wooden shave - probably over a hundred years old - is the absolute best of the bunch.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  3. #3
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    Nice catch.
    "running hammer"?????
    Would that be the same thing as a 'chasing hammer'??
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    Nice catch.
    "running hammer"?????
    Would that be the same thing as a 'chasing hammer'??
    Same, same. As a matter of fact I am probably using the wrong word .
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  5. #5
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    Hey Glenn and Jim i have a couple of these as well but dont use them because they are adjusted by the force of the steel wedge on the blade. How do you recondition these to stay put if they are worn. Mine were my grandfathers and i love a spoke shave and would love to use these but have not worked out how to gently fix em. Had thought of trying to tap the tang and put a brass knurled nut on em but its a little small for that.

    Any ideas?

    Nice hand me downs Glenn especially the hammer. I got one of those curved spokeshaves from Ken when he was selling one once. Actuall pretty handy.
    cheers

  6. #6
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    nice hand me downs glenn,, and that gtr sawn looks like it worked out just fine with it..enjoy your new toys..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  7. #7
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    Great tools and restorarion job Glenn. You always make me turn green of (sane) envy

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Hey Glenn and Jim i have a couple of these as well but dont use them because they are adjusted by the force of the steel wedge on the blade. How do you recondition these to stay put if they are worn. Mine were my grandfathers and i love a spoke shave and would love to use these but have not worked out how to gently fix em. Had thought of trying to tap the tang and put a brass knurled nut on em but its a little small for that.

    Any ideas?
    Rob, you could drill a hole through the original ones to make them straight and cilindrical. Then insert with glue a rod or peg of a hard wood such as boxxwood,hard maple or other drill new holes on them and there you go.

    Making conical holes would be better but unless you have a conical bit with the proper angle, you could make two or three stepped holes starting with the smallest diameter one and ending with the biggest.

    Or you could make a small hole and enlarge it conically with the aid of a round "rat tail" file ( we call them like that here).

    At he worst, as the important thing is the blade, you could make a complete new handle... dunno
    Best regards,
    Toni

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    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  8. #8
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    Yeah good idea Toni. I had thought of doing that but it still leaves the tang type of setting. As i understand it back in the day the guys would tap it at a certain setting and leave it. So they had many with various settings of the blade.

    My other idea was to have a small piece of brass rod brazed onto the end of the blade where the tang is (after having cut the tang off). Then drill out the hole and make them into adjustable shaves. Just would need careful brazing not to wreck the blade properties as far as hardness goes.

    Dunno. Dont want to mess with them until i have found a cheapo at the auction sales and experimented. Too much sentimental value.

    Sorry for the Hijack Glenn.
    cheers

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Sorry for the Hijack Glenn.
    No worries. I'm with Toni on the fill in and re-drill. You could take the blade out of Grandpa's and test the stepped holes in a piece of scrap.

    While we're wandering around. What angle would you guys put on the blade. I sharpened it at the same angle that it came to me with, about 25*. It cut great but dulled quickly; the edge literally folded in some spots. I see the combined angle on some metal shaves are about 40 - 45*. Any thoughts? It is also possible that the blade is just poor. If I decide to go for a better quality blade I will be in the same boat Rob is so we will see how things workout with the refurb ;-)
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 08-30-2010 at 10:32 PM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  10. #10
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    OK, I moved the angle up to 35* and it seems to hold the edge. Still open to more educated comments though.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

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